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Journal of the American Oil Chemists' Society

, Volume 82, Issue 8, pp 585–591 | Cite as

Fuel properties and nitrogen oxide emission levels of biodiesel produced from animal fats

  • Victor T. Wyatt
  • Melissa A. Hess
  • Robert O. Dunn
  • Thomas A. Foglia
  • Michael J. Haas
  • William N. Marmer
Article

Abstract

FAME of lard, beef tallow, and chicken fat were prepared by base-catalyzed transesterification for use as biodiesel fuels. Selected fuel properties of the neat fat-derived methyl esters (B100) were determined and found to meet ASTM specifications. The cold-flow properties, lubricity, and oxidative stability of the B100 fat-derived fuels also were measured. In general, the cold-flow properties of the fat-based fuels were less desirable than those of soy-based biodiesel, but the lubricity and oxidative stability of the fat-based biodiesels were comparable to or better than soy-based biodiesel. Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission tests also were conducted with the animal fat-derived esters and compared with soybean oil biodiesel as 20 vol% blends (B20) in petroleum diesel. The data indicated that the three animal fat-based B20 fuels had lower NOx emission levels (3.2–6.2%) than did the soy-based B20 fuel.

Key Words

Alkyl ester biodiesel chicken fat cloud point cold filter plugging point high-frequency reciprocating rig lard NOx emissions oxidation stability tallow 

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Copyright information

© AOCS Press 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victor T. Wyatt
    • 2
  • Melissa A. Hess
    • 2
  • Robert O. Dunn
    • 1
  • Thomas A. Foglia
    • 2
  • Michael J. Haas
    • 2
  • William N. Marmer
    • 2
  1. 1.Agricultural Research Service, National Center for Agricultural Utilization ResearchUnited States Department of AgriculturePeoria
  2. 2.Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research CenterU.S. Department of AgricultureWyndmoor

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