Protection of α-tocopherol in nonpurified and purified fish oil

Abstract

Menhanden oil was purified by column chromatography to remove minor components. The effect of α-tocopherol (α TOH) (50–500 ppm) on the rate of formation of hydroperoxides in the original menahaden oil and in the purified menhaden triacylglycerol (TAG) fraction was studied at 30°C in the dark. An increase in the initial rate of formation of hydroper-oxides was observed at αTOH concentrations above 100 ppm in both substrates. The original menhaden oil oxidized more rapidly than the purified menhaden, TAG at all antioxidant levels tested, and the presence of minor components in the menhaden oil was found to contribute only to a limited extent to the peroxidizing effect of αTOH. The αTOH did not display any prooxidant activity at either of the concentrations tested when the control oil was the purified menhaden TAG. Addition of ascorbyl palmitate eliminated the initial peroxidizing effect of αTOH, and this emphasizes the participation of the α-toco-pheroxyl radical in the reactions causing an accumulation of hydroperoxides at high concentrations of αTOH.

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Correspondence to Elin Kul.

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Kul, E., Ackman, R.G. Protection of α-tocopherol in nonpurified and purified fish oil. J Amer Oil Chem Soc 78, 197–203 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-001-0243-x

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Key Words

  • Ascorbyl palmitate
  • autoxidation
  • fish oil
  • menhaden oil
  • α-tocopherol