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Antioxidative activity of purple peril (Perilla frutescens L.), moldavian dragonhead (Dracocephalum moldavica L.), and roman chamomile (Anthemis nobilis L.) extracts in rapeseed oil

Abstract

The antioxidant acticities (AA) of acetone oleoresins (AO) and deodorized acetone extracts (DAE) of Roman chamomile (Anthemis nobilis L.), purple peril (Perilla frutescens L.), and Moldavian dragonhead (Dracocephalum moldavica L.) were tested in refined, bleached, and deodorized rapeseed oil by the Schaal oven test at 50°C. The addition of 1,000 ppm of AO and DAE of moldavian dragonhead and Roman chamomile significantly stabilized rapeseed oil. Their AA at the used concentration were higher than AA of a synthetic antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene (200 ppm), in reducing the rate of peroxide value increase to 20 meq/kg. AA of AO of purple peril was not significant, while DAE of this plant increased autoxidation induction period by 22%. It is also worthy of notice that AA of DAE from all investigated plants was slightly higher than AA of AO obtained from the same plants.

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Correspondence to P. R. Venskutonis.

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Povilaityee, V., Venskutonis, P.R. Antioxidative activity of purple peril (Perilla frutescens L.), moldavian dragonhead (Dracocephalum moldavica L.), and roman chamomile (Anthemis nobilis L.) extracts in rapeseed oil. J Amer Oil Chem Soc 77, 951–956 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-000-0150-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11746-000-0150-1

Key Words

  • Antioxidant activity
  • extracts
  • Moldavian dragonhead
  • purple peril
  • rapeseed oil
  • Roman chamomile