Lipids

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 243–248

Changes in body composition in mice during feeding and withdrawal of conjugated linoleic acid

  • Yeonhwa Park
  • Karen J. Albright
  • Jayne M. Storkson
  • Wei Liu
  • Mark E. Cook
  • Michael W. Pariza
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11745-999-0359-7

Cite this article as:
Park, Y., Albright, K.J., Storkson, J.M. et al. Lipids (1999) 34: 243. doi:10.1007/s11745-999-0359-7

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, 8-wk-old mice were fed control diet or diet supplemented with 0.5% conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) to study the effect of CLA on body composition (CLA: 40.8–41.1% c-9,t-11 isomer, 43.5–44.9% t-10,c-12 isomer). The data for CLA-fed mice vs. controls described parallel but significantly distinct responses for both absolute and relative changes in body fat mass (reduced in CLA-fed mice) and for relative changes in whole body protein and whole body water (both of which were increased in CLA-fed mice). In the CLA-fed mice, the effect on whole body protein appeared to precede the reduction in body fat mass. In Experiment 2, weanling mice were fed control diet or diet supplemented with 0.5% CLA for 4 wk (test group), at which time all mice were fed control diet devoid of added CLA. The test group exhibited significantly reduced body fat and significantly enhanced whole body water relative to controls at the time of diet change. Time trends for changes in relative body composition were described by parallel lines where the test group exhibited significantly less body fat but significantly more whole body protein, whole body water, and whole body ash than controls. Tissue CLA levels declined following the withdrawal of CLA from the diet. In skeletal muscle of mice fed CLA-supplemented diet, the t-10,c-12 isomer was cleared significantly faster than the c-9,t-11 CLA isomer.

Abbreviations

ANOVA

analysis of variance

CLA

conjugated linoleic acid

Copyright information

© AOCS Press 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yeonhwa Park
    • 1
  • Karen J. Albright
    • 1
  • Jayne M. Storkson
    • 1
  • Wei Liu
    • 1
  • Mark E. Cook
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael W. Pariza
    • 1
  1. 1.Food Research Institute, Department of Food Microbiology and ToxicologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadison
  2. 2.Department of Animal SciencesUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadison

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