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Lipids

, Volume 34, Issue 2, pp 171–178 | Cite as

Polyunsaturated fatty acid status and neurodevelopment: A summary and critical analysis of the literature

  • Susan E. Carlson
  • Martha Neuringer
Article

Abstract

The rationale for randomized trials designed to measure the effects of variable docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status on neurodevelopment in human infants came from earlier studies of neurodevelopment in animals that were deficient in DHA owing to diets low in α-linolenic acid. The session on neurodevelopment looked at the results of these animal studies and discussed outcomes that appear to be analogous in human infants with variable DHA status. Presentations focused mainly on measures of development that may be attributed to more specific developmental domains (e.g., visual attention, recognition memory, problem-solving), some of which have been shown to be affected by long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status. This paper derives from discussions that took place during the session and reviews subsequent developments in this area. Although more difficult to interpret, global measures of infant development (e.g., the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, and Brunet-Lezine) can only suggest a relationship to specific developmental domains, but they have been applied in some randomized trials of LCPUFA and infant development. Those results are also summarized here.

Keywords

Human Milk Infant Formula Term Infant Human Infant Infant Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

ARA

arachidonic acid

BPD

bronchopulmonary dysplasia

DHA

docosahexaenoic acid

LCPUFA

long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids

MDI

Bayley Mental Developmental Index

SES

socioeconomic status

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Copyright information

© AOCS Press 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School MedicineThe University of Missouri-Kansas CityKansas City
  2. 2.Oregon Health Sciences UniversityPortland
  3. 3.Oregon Regional Primate Research CenterBeaverton
  4. 4.School of NursingUniversity of Missouri-Kansas CityKansas City

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