Cyanobacterium-amended mixes as priming options for stimulating growth and improving nutrient availability in nursery-grown Chrysanthemum rooted stem cuttings

Abstract

The development of suitable nutrient media for high-value floricultural nurseries assumes great significance. In the present investigation, the cuttings of two Chrysanthemum varieties (Pusa Aditya and Jaya) were grown in cyanobacterium-amended mixes (sand or rooting mix comprising cocopeat, vermiculite, and perlite in 3:1:1). Three cyanobacterial cultures—BF1 (Anabaena torulosa), BF4 (Anabaena doliolum) and RPAN8 (Anabaena laxa) were used to amend individually, and analyses undertaken after 30 days were compared with the indole butyric acid (IBA) treated control cuttings. Chrysanthemum cuttings grown in Anabaena laxa amended rooting mix brought about 30–40% enhancement in the concentrations of indole acetic acid (IAA) in the root tissues. Plant growth and biometrical parameters showed one-two fold enhancement in root volume, dry biomass of root and shoot tissues. Available nitrogen and micronutrients were enriched by 50–70% in the cyanobacterium amended mixes of both varieties. A significant and positive correlation was recorded between dehydrogenase activity, root biofilm formation ability of cyanobacteria with plant growth, and elicited plant enzyme activities. Scanning microscopic analyses illustrated effective colonisation by the inoculated cyanobacterium. Anabaena torulosa and Anabaena laxa performed best with Pusa Aditya and Jaya respectively. Pusa Aditya responded better to cyanobacterial cultures as compared to Jaya, in terms of overall performances based on biochemical and biometric analyses. Tripartite interactions among inoculants, medium and plant variety revealed significant effects. Such amended mixes can be integrated into nursery management practices of floricultural crops as an option, to generate more robust and healthy plants, with a reduced dosage of chemicals.

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Acknowledgements

The first author is thankful to the Post Graduate School and Director, Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR)—Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI) and University Grant Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India for the Ph.D. program fellowship. The authors acknowledge the financial support received from the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) Network Project on Microorganisms “Application of Microorganisms in Agricultural and Allied Sectors” (AMAAS) New Delhi. The authors are thankful to the Division of Microbiology, Division of Nematology and Division of Agronomy for providing the necessary facilities towards analyses. The technical help of Shri Gulab Singh, for elemental analyses of potting medium samples is gratefully acknowledged. The authors are also thankful to the farm personnel of Floriculture field for their kind assistance during the preparation of cuttings and establishment of nurseries inside the mist chamber unit.

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AB performed the experiments, analysed the data and wrote the draft manuscript. RP hypothesized, devised and planned the experimental setup and provided experimental resources to AB. DVSR gave critical inputs for nursery layout, provided planting material and mist chamber facility for nursery propagation. GC facilitated SEM analysis of root samples. YSS provided a nutrient analysis facility. LN provided an instrumentation facility to AB and gave needful suggestions during manuscript preparation. RP undertook the final editing of the manuscript. All the authors approved the final version submitted.

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Correspondence to Radha Prasanna.

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Bharti, A., Prasanna, R., Dantuluri, V.S.R. et al. Cyanobacterium-amended mixes as priming options for stimulating growth and improving nutrient availability in nursery-grown Chrysanthemum rooted stem cuttings. Acta Physiol Plant 43, 102 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11738-021-03273-7

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Keywords

  • Anabaena
  • IAA
  • Micronutrients
  • Microscopy
  • Soil-less media