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Gas exchange, carbon balance and stomatal traits in wild and cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes

  • Rajesh Kondamudi
  • K. N. Swamy
  • Y. Venkateswara Rao
  • T. Vishnu Kiran
  • K. Suman
  • D. Sanjeeva Rao
  • P. Raghuveer Rao
  • D. Subrahmanyam
  • N. Sarla
  • B. Ramana Kumari
  • S. R. VoletiEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Carbon balancing within the plant species is an important feature for climatic adaptability. Photosynthesis and respiration traits are directly linked with carbon balance. These features were studied in 20 wild rice accessions Oryza spp., and cultivars. Wide variation was observed within the wild rice accessions for photosynthetic oxygen evolution or photosynthetic rate (A), dark (R d), and light induced respiration (LIR) rates, as well as stomatal density and number. The mean rate of A varied from 10.49 μmol O2 m−2 s−1 in cultivated species and 13.09 μmol O2 m−2 s−1 in wild spp., The mean R d is 2.09 μmol O2 m−2 s−1 and 2.31 μmol O2 m−2 s−1 in cultivated and wild spp., respectively. Light induced Respiration (LIR) was found to be almost twice in wild rice spp., (16.75 μmol O2 m−2 s−1) compared to cultivated Oryza spp., Among the various parameters, this study reveals LIR and A as the key factors for positive carbon balance. Stomatal contribution towards carbon balance appears to be more dependent on abaxial surface where several number of stomata are situated. Correlation analysis indicates that R d and LIR increase with the increase in A. In this study, O. nivara (CR 100100, CR 100097), O. rufipogon (IR 103404) and O. glumaepatula (IR104387) were identified as potential donors which could be used in rice breeding program. Co-ordination between gas exchange and patchiness in stomatal behaviour appears to be important for carbon balance and environmental adaptation of wild rice accessions, therefore, survival under harsh environment.

Keywords

Wild rice accessions Photosynthesis Dark respiration Light induced respiration Stomata 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Financial assistance received from ICAR, Ministry of Agriculture, Govt. of India (F.No. Phy/NICRA/2011-2012) is duly acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rajesh Kondamudi
    • 1
  • K. N. Swamy
    • 1
  • Y. Venkateswara Rao
    • 1
  • T. Vishnu Kiran
    • 1
  • K. Suman
    • 1
  • D. Sanjeeva Rao
    • 1
  • P. Raghuveer Rao
    • 1
  • D. Subrahmanyam
    • 1
  • N. Sarla
    • 1
  • B. Ramana Kumari
    • 1
  • S. R. Voleti
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Plant PhysiologyIndian Institute of Rice ResearchRajendra NagarIndia

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