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Cinnamate and cinnamate derivatives in plants

Abstract

Cinnamic acid, an ubiquitous alpha beta unsaturated acid, upon hydroxylation yields p-hydroxy cinnamic acid or p-coumarate, a plant mono phenol. Being, precursor for the production of various di (lignans), polyphenols (lignins) and also substituted derivatives, it seems to be an important aromatic chemical in growth and development of plants. This aromatic chemical substance synthesized primarily by almost all forms of plants, seemingly involves in the regulation of various physiological processes. The presence of this ubiquitous plant alpha beta unsaturated acid and its derivatives have been adopted by plants for various mechanisms. An effort towards the consolidation of these is made here.

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Acknowledgments

The authors acknowledge the facilities provided by the Head, School of Studies in Botany, Jiwaji University, Gwalior. The grant by UGC, New Delhi and MPCST, Bhopal is gratefully acknowledged for carrying out this work.

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Correspondence to K. K. Koul.

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Communicated by A. K. Kononowicz.

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Shuab, R., Lone, R. & Koul, K.K. Cinnamate and cinnamate derivatives in plants. Acta Physiol Plant 38, 64 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11738-016-2076-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11738-016-2076-z

Keywords

  • Plant phenolics
  • Phenylpropanoids
  • Cinnamic acid
  • Cinnamate derivatives
  • Ubiquitous presence