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Eight-points-acupuncture and ancient Chinese contraindications in acupuncture: Two methods of improving acupuncture treatment based upon ancient Chinese sources, and clinical experiences

Abstract

According to ancient and present Chinese sources the Eight Confluent Points are essentials of acupuncture and can treat all kinds of diseases. They exert a fundamental influence on the Twelve Regular Meridians and their mobilization can be seen as a necessity for a successful acupuncture treatment. For this they should play a major role in acupuncture. In European acupuncture teachings there is also the opinion that by too much needling of the Eight Confluent Points the qi of the organism might get exhausted which will deteriorate the patient’s symptoms and eventually will create new symptoms. Here it will be shown that deterioration as well as the creation of new symptoms due to acupuncture is caused by not observing the contraindications in acupuncture as set up in ancient China provided that syndrome differentiation, point selection and stimulation have been correct. In opposition to this, all of the Eight Extraordinary Channels are to be activated at first and then the Twelve Regular Meridians are to be mobilized in order to achieve therapeutic effects.

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References

  1. Slopek, Axel, FENG Haitao. Qi-Acupuncture: An Effective and Simple Acupuncture Method Based Upon Ancient Chinese Acupuncture Literature and Clinical Experience, Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science, 2005, 3(3): 59–62.

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Slopek, A., Feng, Ht. Eight-points-acupuncture and ancient Chinese contraindications in acupuncture: Two methods of improving acupuncture treatment based upon ancient Chinese sources, and clinical experiences. J. Acupunct. Tuina. Sci. 4, 321–324 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11726-006-0321-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11726-006-0321-5

Key Words

  • Acupuncture-Moxibustion
  • Eight Confluence Points
  • Eight Extraordinary Channels

CLC Number

  • R246.9