Syndrome de l’intestin irritable (SII) : nouvelles pistes physiopathologiques

Irritable bowel syndrome: new pathophysiological options

Résumé

La mise en évidence d’une nouvelle forme clinique du syndrome de l’intestin irritable (SII), le SII postinfectieux (SII-PI), suggère que des phénomènes inflammatoires aigus pourraient se pérenniser, entraîner une cascade de réaction pro-inflammatoires et favoriser l’apparition d’un SII. Ce modèle clinique a permis de mettre au point de nouveaux modèles animaux du SII. Ces modèles ont montré le rôle des cellules immunitaires et des troubles de la perméabilité intestinale au cours de toutes les formes de SII. Ce concept pourrait déboucher sur de nouvelles options thérapeutiques.

Abstract

The discovery of a new clinical form of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), postinfectious IBS, suggests that acute inflammatory processes may cause a host of proinflammatory reactions, which result in IBS. This clinical model allowed new animal models of IBS to be studied. These highlighted the role of both immune cells and intestinal permeability disorders in all forms of IBS. This could result in new therapeutic options for irritable bowel syndrome.

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Correspondence to L. Buéno.

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Buéno, L. Syndrome de l’intestin irritable (SII) : nouvelles pistes physiopathologiques. Colon Rectum 1, 230–235 (2007). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11725-007-0061-9

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Mots clés

  • Syndrome de l’intestin irritable
  • Inflammation
  • Gastroentérite infectieuse
  • Mastocytes
  • Perméabilité intestinale

Keywords

  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Inflammation
  • Infectious gastroenteritis
  • Mastocytes
  • Intestinal permeability