Dao

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 83–97 | Cite as

Filial Obligations: A Comparative Study

Article

Abstract

The nature of the special obligation that a child has towards her parent(s) is widely discussed in Confucianism. It has also received considerable discussion by analytic commentators. This essay compares and contrasts the accounts of filial obligation found in the two philosophical traditions. The analytic writers mentioned above have explored filial obligations by relating them to other special obligations, such as obligations of debt, friendship, or gratitude. I examine these accounts and try to uncover the implicit assumptions therein about the scope and nature of such filial obligations. I then similarly examine Confucian filial obligations (CFOs) by relating them to these other special obligations of debt, gratitude, and so on. My findings are used to highlight crucial differences in the scope and conception of filial obligations in these two traditions.

Keywords

Confucian filial obligations (CFOs) Filial obligations in analytic philosophy Comparative philosophy 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. The Analects. 1979. Trans. by D. C. Lau. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  2. Austen, Jane. 2003. Emma. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  3. Blustein, Jeffrey. 1982. Parents and Children: The Ethics of the Family. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  4. de Bary, Wm Theodore. 1991. The Trouble with Confucianism. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Dixon, Nicholas. 1995. “The Friendship Model of Filial Obligations.” Journal of Applied Philosophy 12.1: 77–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. English, Jane. 1979. “What Do Grown Children Owe to Their Parents?” In Having Children: Philosophical and Legal Reflections on Parenthood, edited by Onora O’Neill and William Ruddick. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Hoff Summers, Christina. 1986. “Filial Morality.” Journal of Philosophy 83.8: 439–456.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Ivanhoe, Philip J. 2004. “Filial Piety as a Virtue.” In Filial Piety in Chinese Thought and History, edited by Alan Chan and Sor-Hoon Tan. London: RoutledgeCurzon.Google Scholar
  9. _____. 2009. “Filial Piety as a Virtue.” In Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems, edited by Rebecca L. Walker and P. J. Ivanhoe. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Jecker, Nancy S. 1989. “Are Filial Duties Unfounded?” American Philosophical Quarterly 26.1: 73–80.Google Scholar
  11. Jeske, Diane. 1998. “Families, Friends and Special Obligations.” Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28.4: 527–556.Google Scholar
  12. Keller, Simon. 2006. “Four Theories of Filial Duty.” Philosophical Quarterly 56.223: 254–274.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Lai, Whalen. 1996. “Friendship in Confucian China: Classical and Late Ming.” In Friendship East and West: Philosophical Perspectives, edited by Oliver Leaman. Richmond: Curzon.Google Scholar
  14. Lo, Yuek-keung. 2004. “Filial Devotion for Women: A Buddhist Testimony from Third-Century China.” In Filial Piety in Chinese Thought and History, edited by Alan Chan and Sor-Hoon Tan. London: RoutledgeCurzon.Google Scholar
  15. Mencius. 1970. Trans. by D. C. Lau. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  16. Simmons, A. John. 1979. Moral Principles and Political Obligations. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Taylor, Rodney Leon, and Howard Y. F. Choy, eds. 2005. “Hsiao.” In The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Confucianism, 223. New York: Rosen.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyNational University of Singapore3 Arts LinkSingapore

Personalised recommendations