Frontiers of Earth Science

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 40–50 | Cite as

Application of geo-microbial prospecting method for finding oil and gas reservoirs

  • M. A. Rasheed
  • Syed Zaheer Hasan
  • P. L. Srinivasa Rao
  • Annapurna Boruah
  • V. Sudarshan
  • B. Kumar
  • T. Harinarayana
Research Article

Abstract

Microbial prospecting of hydrocarbons is based on the detection of anomalous population of hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria in the surface soils, indicates the presence of subsurface oil and gas accumulation. The technique is based on the seepage of light hydrocarbon gases such as C1–C4 from the oil and gas pools to the shallow surface that provide the suitable conditions for the development of highly specialized bacterial population. These bacteria utilize hydrocarbon gases as their only food source and are found enriched in the near surface soils above the hydrocarbon bearing structures. The methodology involves the collection of soil samples from the survey area, packing, preservation and storage of samples in pre-sterilized sample bags under aseptic and cold conditions till analysis and isolation and enumeration of hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria such as methane, ethane, propane, and butane oxidizers. The contour maps for the population density of hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria are drawn and the data can be integrated with geological, geochemical, geophysical methods to evaluate the hydrocarbon prospect of an area and to prioritize the drilling locations thereby reducing the drilling risks and achieve higher success in petroleum exploration. Microbial Prospecting for Oil and Gas (MPOG) method success rate has been reported to be 90%. The paper presents details of microbial prospecting for oil and gas studies, excellent methodology, future development trends, scope, results of study area, case studies and advantages.

Keywords

hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria microbial prospecting micro-seepage petroleum exploration 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Dionisi H M, Harms G, Layton A C, Gregory I R, Parker J, Hawkins S A, Robinson K G, Sayler G S (2003). Power analysis for real-time PCR quantification of genes in activated sludge and analysis of the variability introduced by DNA extraction. Appl Environ Microbiol, 69(11): 6597–6604CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Harinarayana T (2008). Applications of magnetotelluric studies in India. Memoir Geological Society of India, 68: 337–356Google Scholar
  3. He J Z, Shen J P, Zhang L M, Zhu Y G, Zheng Y M, Xu M G, Di H J (2007). Quantitative analyses of the abundance and composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea of a Chinese upland red soil under long-term fertilization practices. Environ Microbiol, 9(9): 2364–2374CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Hugenholtz P, Goebel B, Pace N R (1998). Impact of cultured independent studies on emerging phylogenetic view of bacteria diversity. J Bacteriol, 180: 4765–4774Google Scholar
  5. Kaster K M, Bonaunet K, Berland H, Kjeilen-Eilertsen G, Brakstad O G (2009). Characterisation of cultured-independent and -dependent microbial communities in a high-temperature offshore chalk petroleum reservoir. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, 96(4): 423–439CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Lakshmi M, Rasheed M A, Madhavi T, Patil D J, Dayal A M (2012). Characterization of light gaseous hydrocarbons using geochemical and microbiological techniques in the near surface soils of Krishna-Godavari Basin, Andhra Pradesh, India. J Environ Biol, 33: 67–79Google Scholar
  7. Lysnes K, Bodtker G, Torsvik T, Bjornestad E Ø, Sunde E (2009). Microbial response to reinjection of produced water in an oil reservoir. Appl Environ Microbiol, 83(6): 1143–1157Google Scholar
  8. Mani D, Kumar T S, Rasheed M A, Patil D J, Dayal A M, Rao T G, Balaram V (2011). Soil Iodine determination in Deccan Syneclise, India, implications to near surface geochemical exploration. Nat Resour Res, 20: 75–88CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Miqueletto P B, Andreote F D, Dias A C, Ferreira J C, Dos Santos Neto E V, de Oliveira V M (2011). Cultivation-independent methods applied to the microbial prospection of oil and gas in soil from a sedimentary basin in Brazil. AMB Express, 1(1): 35CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Pareja L (1994). Combined microbial, seismic surveys predict oil and gas occurrences in Bolivia. Oil Gas J, 24: 68–70Google Scholar
  11. Rasheed M A, Kalpana M S, Veena Prasanna M, Lakshmi M, Madhavi T, Tiwari D M, Patil D J, Dayal A M, Raju S V (2012a). Geomicrobial and light gaseous hydrocarbon anomalies in the near surface soils of Deccan Syneclise Basin, India: implications to hydrocarbon resource potential. J Petrol Sci Eng, 84–85: 33–41CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Rasheed MA, Lakshmi M, Rao P L S, Kalpana MS, Dayal AM, Patil D J (2013a). Geochemical evidences of trace metal anomalies for finding hydrocarbon microseepage in the petroliferous regions of Tatipaka and Pasarlapudi areas of Krishna Godavari Basin, India. Petroleum Science, 10(1): 19–29CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Rasheed M A, Lakshmi M, Rao P L S, Patil D J, Dayal A M, Sudarshan V (2012b). Relevance of Pentane and hexane utilizing bacterial indicators for finding hydrocarbon micro seepage: a study from Jamnagar Sub-basin, Saurashtra, Gujarat, India. Nat Resour Res, 21(4): 427–441CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Rasheed M A, Lakshmi M, Srinu D, Dayal A M (2011). Bacteria as indicators for finding oil and gas reservoirs: a case study of Bikaner-Nagaur Basin, Rajasthan, India. Petroleum Science, 8(3): 264–268CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Rasheed M A, Patil D J, Dayal A M (2013b). Hydrocarbons. In: Microbial Techniques for Hydrocarbon Exploration, ISBN 979-953-307-936-2: INTECH Publishers, 195–218Google Scholar
  16. Rasheed M A, Veena Prasanna M, Lakshmi M, Madhavi T, Kalpana M S, Patil D J, Dayal A M (2012c). Geo-microbial prospecting studies of surface sediments from petroliferous region of the Mehsana block, North Cambay Basin, India. J Geol Soc India, 80(2): 267–275CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Rasheed MA, Veena Prasanna M, Satish Kumar T, Patil D J, Dayal A M (2008). Geo-microbial prospecting method for hydrocarbon exploration in Vengannapalli village, Cuddapah Basin, India. Curr Sci, 95: 361–366Google Scholar
  18. Schumacher D (2003). Geochemical exploration for oil and gasstrategies for success: an exploration short course sponsored by National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad, India, 1–175Google Scholar
  19. Schumacher D, Abrams M A (1996). Hydrocarbon migration and its near surface expression. AAPG Mem, 66: 446Google Scholar
  20. Singh D, Alat C A, Singh R N, Gupta V P (1997). Source rock characterization and hydrocarbon generating potential of Mesozoic sediments in Lodhika area, Saurashtra Basin, Gujarat. In: Proeedings second Int. Pet. Conf. and Exbn. Petrotech, New Delhi, 205–220Google Scholar
  21. Skovhus T L, Ramsing N B, Holmström C, Kjelleberg S, Dahllöf I (2004). Real-time quantitative PCR for assessment of abundance of Pseudoalteromonas species in marine samples. Appl Environ Microbiol, 70(4): 2373–2382CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Tucker J, Hitzman D (1994). Detailed microbial surveys help improve reservoir characterization. Oil Gas J, 6: 65–69Google Scholar
  23. Veena Prasanna M, Rasheed M A, Patil D J, Dayal A M (2013). Geo-microbiological studies in conjunction with different geo-scientific studies for the evaluation of hydrocarbon prospects in Proterozoic Vindhyan Basin, India. Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering, Available online, 29 May 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.petrol.2013.04.010 Google Scholar
  24. Wagner M, Wagner M, Piske J, Smit R (2002). Case histories of microbial prospection for oil and gas. AAPG Studies in Geology 48 and SEG Geophysical References Series, 11: 453–479Google Scholar
  25. Zhang F, She Y, Zheng Y, Zhou Z, Kong S, Hou D (2010). Molecular biologic techniques applied to the microbial prospecting of oil and gas in the Ban 876 gas and oil field in China. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol, 86(4): 1183–1194CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Rasheed
    • 1
  • Syed Zaheer Hasan
    • 1
  • P. L. Srinivasa Rao
    • 1
  • Annapurna Boruah
    • 1
  • V. Sudarshan
    • 2
  • B. Kumar
    • 1
  • T. Harinarayana
    • 1
  1. 1.Petroleum Research WingGujarat Energy Research and Management Institute (GERMI)GandhinagarIndia
  2. 2.Department of Applied GeochemistryOsmaina UniversityHyderabadIndia

Personalised recommendations