Frontiers of Materials Science

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 66–74 | Cite as

Isolation of fucoxanthin from Sargassum thunbergii and preparation of microcapsules based on palm stearin solid lipid core

  • Xuanxuan Wang
  • Hongyan Li
  • Fangqin Wang
  • Guixue Xia
  • Hongjun Liu
  • Xiaojie Cheng
  • Ming Kong
  • Ya Liu
  • Chao Feng
  • Xiguang Chen
  • Ying Wang
Research Article
  • 70 Downloads

Abstract

The objective of this study was to isolate fucoxanthin from Sargassum thunbergii and develop microcapsules with palm stearin as the solid lipid core for stability and efficient oral delivery of fucoxanthin. The microcapsules had smooth surfaces with the volume weighted mean diameter (d4.3) of 19.19 μm. Encapsulation efficiency and loading capacity of microcapsules with fucoxanthin were 98.3% and 0.04%, respectively. Moreover, the fucoxanthin in microcapsules presented higher stability than free fucoxanthin against light, humidity and temperature. Especially, the retention rates of fucoxanthin encapsulated in microcapsules reached 97.20% at 4°C, 92.60% at 25°C, 92.32% with the relative humidity of 33% and 92.60% in the dark. The cumulative amount of fucoxanthin released from microcapsules was 22.92% in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and 56.55% in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF).

Keywords

fucoxanthin Sargassum thunbergii microcapsules palm stearin solid lipid core 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Public Science and Technology Research Funds Projects of Ocean (Grant No. 201505022), the National Natural Science Foundation of China NSFC-Shandong Joint Fund (U1406402-5), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 81671828), and the Taishan Scholar Program of China.

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xuanxuan Wang
    • 1
  • Hongyan Li
    • 2
  • Fangqin Wang
    • 1
  • Guixue Xia
    • 1
  • Hongjun Liu
    • 2
  • Xiaojie Cheng
    • 1
  • Ming Kong
    • 1
  • Ya Liu
    • 1
  • Chao Feng
    • 1
  • Xiguang Chen
    • 1
    • 3
  • Ying Wang
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Marine Life ScienceOcean University of ChinaQingdaoChina
  2. 2.Aquatic Product Processing & Quality Control Research CentreMarine Biology Institute of Shandong ProvinceQingdaoChina
  3. 3.Laboratory for Marine Drug and BioproductQingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and TechnologyQingdaoChina

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