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Novel lysosome-targeted anticancer fluorescent agents used in zebrafish and nude mouse tumour imaging

Abstract

The design of three novel fatty nitrogen mustard-based anticancer agents with fluorophores incorporated into the alkene structure (CXL 118, CXL121, and CXL122) is described in this report. The results indicated that these compounds are selectively located in lysosomes and exhibit effective antitumour activity. Notably, these compounds can directly serve as both reporting and imaging agents in vitro and in vivo without the need to add other fluorescent tagging agents.

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Acknowledgements

This work was financially supported by Science and Technology Department of Sichuan Province (Nos. 2020YJ0237, 2018SZ0030, 2019YFH0119), National Clinical Research Center for Geriatrics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University (Z20191006) and the 1·3·5 Project for Disciplines of Excellence, West China Hospital, Sichuan University (Nos. ZYJC18025 and ZYJC18003).

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Correspondence to Weihong Kuang or Zhihui Li.

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Xiuli Chen, Feng Liu, Bin Chen, Haiying Wu, Kun Li, Yongmei Xie, Weihong Kuang and Zhihui Li declare that they have no conflict of interest. All institutional and national guidelines for the care and use of laboratory animals were followed.

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Chen, X., Liu, F., Chen, B. et al. Novel lysosome-targeted anticancer fluorescent agents used in zebrafish and nude mouse tumour imaging. Front. Chem. Sci. Eng. (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11705-021-2075-5

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Keywords

  • fluorescent drug
  • lysosomal
  • anticancer
  • zebrafish
  • nude-mouse tumour imaging