Advertisement

Obesity Surgery

, Volume 28, Issue 3, pp 869–873 | Cite as

Effect of Employment Status on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Long-Term Post-Bariatric Surgery

  • Ryan E. R. Reid
  • Katerina Jirasek
  • Tamara E. Carver
  • Tyler G. R. Reid
  • Kathleen M. Andersen
  • Nicolas V. Christou
  • Ross E. Andersen
Brief Communication

Abstract

Introduction

Inactivity and weight regain are serious problems post-bariatric surgery. Nearly half of waking time is spent at work, representing an opportunity to accumulate physical activity and help avoid weight regain.

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential differences in physical activity and sedentary time by employment status post-bariatric surgery.

Methods

A total of 48 adults (employed (n = 19), unemployed (n = 29)) aged 50.7 ± 9.4 years, BMI = 34.4 ± 10.1 kg/m2, and 10 ± 3 years post-surgery participated. ActivPAL accelerometers measured transitions, steps, and sedentary time for 7 days.

Results

Participants worked on average 8.7 ± 1.8 h/day. Twenty-one percent of employed met step/day guidelines on work-days compared to 10% of unemployed. Employed persons transitioned from sitting-to-standing more on work-days (58.6 ± 17.8) than unemployed (45.0 ± 15.4). Employment status did not influence activity or sedentarism on weekend/non-working-days.

Conclusion

Employment status may be associated with meaningful improvements in activity post-bariatric surgery.

Keywords

Occupation Obesity Physical activity Sedentary time Leisure 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Dr. R Reid receives funding from the Fonds de recherche du Québec- Santé. Dr. Carver, Dr. T Reid, Ms. Jirasek, Ms. Andersen, Dr. Christou, and Dr. Andersen have nothing to declare.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in these studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

References

  1. 1.
    Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Adult obesity acts [Internet]. www.cdc.gov. [cited 2017 May 24]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html
  2. 2.
    Guh DP, Zhang W, Bansback N, et al. The incidence of co-morbidities related to obesity and overweight: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Public Health. 2009;9:1197–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bond DS, Thomas JG, Unick JL, et al. Self-reported and objectively measured sedentary behavior in bariatric surgery candidates. SOARD. 2013;9:123–8.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Church TS, Thomas DM, Tudor-Locke C, et al. Trends over 5 decades in U.S. occupation-related physical activity and their associations with obesity. PLOS One. 2011;6:e19657–7.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pronk NP, Martinson B, Kessler RC, et al. The association between work performance and physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity. J Occup Environ Med. 2004;46(1):19–25.  https://doi.org/10.1097/01.jom.0000105910.69449.b7.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Reid RER, Carver TE, Andersen KM, et al. Physical activity and sedentary behavior in bariatric patients long-term post-surgery. Obes Surg. 2015;25(6):1073–7.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11695-015-1624-8.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Van Domelen DR, Koster A, Caserotti P, Brychta RJ, Chen KY, McClain JJ, et al. Employment and Physical Activity in the U.S. AMEPRE. 2011;41:136–45.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Reid RER, Carver TE, Reid TGR, et al. Effects of neighborhood walkability on physical activity and sedentary behavior long-term post-bariatric surgery. Obes Surg. 2017;27(6):1589–94.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11695-016-2494-4.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Bartley M. Unemployment and ill health: understanding the relationship. J Epidemiol Community Health. 1994;48(4):333–7.  https://doi.org/10.1136/jech.48.4.333.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Velcu L, Adolphine R, Mourelo R, et al. Weight loss, quality of life and employment status after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: 5-year analysis. SOARD. 2005;1:413–6.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryan E. R. Reid
    • 1
  • Katerina Jirasek
    • 1
  • Tamara E. Carver
    • 2
  • Tyler G. R. Reid
    • 3
  • Kathleen M. Andersen
    • 2
  • Nicolas V. Christou
    • 4
  • Ross E. Andersen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Kinesiology and Physical EducationMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Department of Family MedicineMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  3. 3.Department of Aeronautics and AstronauticsStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  4. 4.Bariatric SurgeryMcGill University Health CenterMontrealCanada

Personalised recommendations