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Obesity Surgery

, Volume 28, Issue 6, pp 1540–1545 | Cite as

Food Tolerance and Eating Behavior After Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery

  • Cynthia M. de A. Godoy
  • Luana Celi Silva Aprígio
  • Eudes Paiva de Godoy
  • Mariana Camara Furtado
  • Daniel Coelho
  • Lourdes Bernadete Rocha de Souza
  • Antònio Manuel Goveial de Oliveira
Original Contributions
  • 217 Downloads

Abstract

Background

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery often leads to food intolerance, especially protein intake.

Aim

This is to investigate the association of food intolerance with protein intake and chewing parameters in patients who underwent RYGB surgery 2 years prior.

Methods

An observational study was carried out in 30 patients aged between 18 and 60 years old with at least a 2-year postoperative period since undergoing RYGB surgery. A specific questionnaire was applied to obtain a food tolerance score; a masticatory efficiency, chewing cycles, and time were evaluated with a standard test based on the size of the fragmentation of almonds and of meat after a certain chewing time. Protein intake was evaluated by 24-h dietary recall.

Results

Mean age was 42.3 ± 11.2 years; mean body mass index was 33 ± 6 kg/m2; and mean time since surgery was 4.9 years. The food tolerance score was 23.4 ± 3.3 points. There was no evidence of an association between food tolerance and chewing efficiency for meat (p = 0.28) nor between food tolerance and protein intake (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.03, p = 0.86). Regarding chewing efficiency with almonds, tolerance was higher in patients with optimal efficiency than among those with good and acceptable efficiency (p = 0.01).

Conclusions

In the evaluation of mastication using almonds, food tolerance increased with the number of chewing cycles and with greater chewing efficiency; the same association was not found in the evaluation using red meat.

Keywords

Bariatric surgery Food intolerance Gastric bypass Eating behavior 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study. This study was approved by the Ethics Research Committee of the institution under number 765.617/14.

Human and Animal Rights

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia M. de A. Godoy
    • 1
  • Luana Celi Silva Aprígio
    • 2
  • Eudes Paiva de Godoy
    • 3
  • Mariana Camara Furtado
    • 4
  • Daniel Coelho
    • 3
  • Lourdes Bernadete Rocha de Souza
    • 5
  • Antònio Manuel Goveial de Oliveira
    • 6
  1. 1.Bariatric Surgery LaboratoryHospital Universitário Onofre Lopes HUOLNatalBrazil
  2. 2.Instituto VidaNatalBrazil
  3. 3.Clinical Surgery UnitHospital Universitário Onofre Lopes HUOLNatalBrazil
  4. 4.Department of NutritionHospital Universitário Onofre Lopes HUOLNatalBrazil
  5. 5.Department of PhonoaudiologyHospital Universitário Onofre Lopes HUOLNatalBrazil
  6. 6.Department of Pharmacy, Health Sciences CenterUniversidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte—UFRNNatalBrazil

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