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Solid Versus Liquid—Satiety Study in Well-Adjusted Lap-Band Patients

Abstract

Background

Patients following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) are generally advised to avoid liquid calories, opt for solids and refrain from drinking with meals as this is believed to prolong satiety. The role of food consistency and satiety following LAGB is largely uninvestigated. The purpose of the study was to: (1) determine if food consistency impacts on post meal satiety in participants with well-adjusted LAGB and (2) compare the level of satiety achieved after consuming a solid versus a liquid meal between groups.

Methods

Twenty intervention (well-adjusted LAGB) and 20 control participants were recruited. All participants consumed three iso-caloric breakfasts that were randomised for nine mornings. Participants were asked to rate their satiety on visual analogue scales (VAS) at set times after the test meal. Areas under the curve (AUC) VAS scores were compared within and between groups.

Results

Solids (bars) with or without water provided greater satiety than the liquids (shakes) for both groups. Drinking water with the bar did influence satiety in the intervention group. For the intervention group (LAGB), AUC VAS values for the bar with water were 77.4 ± 11.2* and 72.4 ± 16.7* for the controls.

Conclusion

Solid meals are more satisfying in both LAGB and non-LAGB individuals. However, a solid meal with accompanying water did not alter meal satiety.

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Acknowledgments

The research team acknowledges Nestle for supplying Optifast© meal replacement and Benecalorie© products used in this study, and LapSurgery Australia for making this research possible. This study was not funded by an external organisation.

Conflict of Interest

There is no conflict of interest to disclose for this research for Miss Laura V. Jones, Dr. Kay M. Jones, Mr. Chris Hensman, Mrs. Ruth D. Bertuch and Toni L. McGee. John B. Dixon acknowledges the support of the NHMRC as a senior research fellow. John B. Dixon is a consultant for Allergan Inc and on the medical advisory board for Nestle Health Australia. LapSurgery Australia receives specific research support for Allergan Inc, however not for this particular study. Monash University receives specific research support for Allergan Inc, however not for this particular study.

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Correspondence to John B. Dixon.

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Jones, L.V., Jones, K.M., Hensman, C. et al. Solid Versus Liquid—Satiety Study in Well-Adjusted Lap-Band Patients. OBES SURG 23, 1266–1272 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11695-013-0897-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11695-013-0897-z

Keywords

  • Obesity
  • Laparoscopic adjustable banding
  • Food consistency
  • Satiety