Brain Imaging and Behavior

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 86–97

Cognitive dysfunction and symptom burden in women treated for breast cancer: a prospective behavioral and fMRI analysis

  • Mi Sook Jung
  • Min Zhang
  • Mary K. Askren
  • Marc G. Berman
  • Scott Peltier
  • Daniel F. Hayes
  • Barbara Therrien
  • Patricia A. Reuter-Lorenz
  • Bernadine Cimprich
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s11682-016-9507-8

Cite this article as:
Jung, M.S., Zhang, M., Askren, M.K. et al. Brain Imaging and Behavior (2017) 11: 86. doi:10.1007/s11682-016-9507-8

Abstract

Neural dysfunction and cognitive complaints are associated with chemotherapy for breast cancer although trajectory and contributory factors remain unclear. We prospectively examined neurocognition using fMRI and self-reported cognitive, physical and psychological symptoms in women treated with adjuvant chemotherapy over one year. Patients treated with (n = 28) or without (n = 34) chemotherapy for localized breast cancer and healthy controls (n = 30) performed a Verbal Working Memory Task (VWMT) during fMRI and provided self-reports at baseline (pre-adjuvant treatment), five- (M5) and 12-months (M12). Repeated measures ANOVA and multivariable regression determined change over time and possible predictors (e.g., hemoglobin, physical symptoms, worry) of VWMT performance, fMRI activity in the frontoparietal executive network, and cognitive complaints at M12. Trajectories of change in VWMT performance for chemotherapy and healthy control groups differed significantly with the chemotherapy group performing worse at M12. Chemotherapy patients had persistently higher spatial variance (neural inefficiency) in executive network fMRI-activation than both other groups from baseline to M12. Cognitive complaints were similar among groups over time. At M12, VWMT performance and executive network spatial variance were each independently predicted by chemotherapy treatment and their respective baseline values, while cognitive complaints were predicted by baseline level, physical symptoms and worry. Executive network inefficiency and neurocognitive performance deficits pre-adjuvant treatment predict cognitive dysfunction one-year post-baseline, particularly in chemotherapy-treated patients. Persistent cognitive complaints are linked with physical symptom severity and worry regardless of treatment. Pre-chemotherapy interventions should target both neurocognitive deficits and symptom burden to improve cognitive outcomes for breast cancer survivors.

Keywords

Cognitive disorders Attention Short-term memory Functional magnetic resonance imaging Symptom assessment 

Supplementary material

11682_2016_9507_MOESM1_ESM.docx (230 kb)
ESM 1(DOCX 230 kb)
11682_2016_9507_MOESM2_ESM.docx (27 kb)
ESM 2(DOCX 26 kb)

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Institutes of Health (US)
  • R01 NR01039

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mi Sook Jung
    • 1
  • Min Zhang
    • 2
  • Mary K. Askren
    • 3
  • Marc G. Berman
    • 4
  • Scott Peltier
    • 2
  • Daniel F. Hayes
    • 2
  • Barbara Therrien
    • 2
  • Patricia A. Reuter-Lorenz
    • 2
  • Bernadine Cimprich
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Nursing Chungnam National UniversityDaejeonSouth Korea
  2. 2.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.University of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  4. 4.University of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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