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Journal of Forestry Research

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 359–364 | Cite as

Improving Acacia auriculiformis seedlings using microbial inoculant (Beneficial Microorganisms)

  • Bayezid M. Khan
  • M. K. Hossain
  • M. A. U. Mridha
Original Paper

Abstract

A microbial inoculant, known as effective microorganisms (EM), was applied to determine its efficacy on seed germination and seedling growth in the nursery of Acacia auriculiformis A Cunn. ex Benth. The seedlings were grown in a mixture of sandy soil and cow dung (3:1) and kept in polybags; EM was poured at different concentrations (0.1%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5% and 10%). Seed germination rate and growth parameters of seedlings — shoot and root lengths, fresh and dry weights of shoots and roots, vigor, volume, and quality indices and sturdiness — were measured. The nodulation status influenced by EM was also observed, along with the measurement of pigment contents in leaves. The highest germination rate (72%) was observed in 2% EM solution while the lowest (55%) was found in control treatment. The highest shoot and root lengths (30.6 cm and 31.2 cm respectively) were recorded in 2% EM and were significantly (p <0.05) different from control. Both fresh and dry weights of shoots were maximum (8.66 g and 2.99 g respectively) in 2% EM, whereas both fresh and dry weights of root were maximum (2.56 g and 1.23 g respectively) in 5% EM solution. Although the highest vigor index, volume index, and sturdiness (4450, 628 and 67.5 respectively) were found in 2% EM, the highest quality index (0.455) was found in 5% EM solution. The nodule number was higher at a very low (0.5%) concentration of EM but it normally decreased with the increase of concentration. The contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and carotenoid were maximum (43.26 mg·L−1, 13.56 mg·L−1and 17.99 mg·L−1 respectively) in 2% EM. Therefore, low concentration of EM (up to 2%) can be recommended for getting maximum seed germination and seedling development of A. auriculiformis in the nursery.

Keywords

Microbial inoculant (EM) germination seedling vigor leaf’s pigment nodulation status 

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Copyright information

© Northeast Forestry University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bayezid M. Khan
    • 1
  • M. K. Hossain
    • 1
  • M. A. U. Mridha
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Forestry & Environmental SciencesUniversity of ChittagongChittagongBangladesh
  2. 2.Plant Production DepartmentKing Saud UniversityRiyadhKingdom of Saudi Arabia

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