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Journal of Forestry Research

, Volume 22, Issue 1, pp 47–52 | Cite as

Influence of cytokinins, basal media and pH on adventitious shoot regeneration from excised root cultures of Albizia lebbeck

  • Shahnaz Perveen
  • Ankita Varshney
  • Mohammad AnisEmail author
  • Ibrahim M. Aref
Original Paper

Abstract

A highly reproducible and efficient in vitro shoot regeneration system was developed in a potential medicinal plant, Albizia lebbeck using root explants. Root explants from 15 day-old-aseptic seedlings were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with different concentrations (0.5, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 μM) of 6-Benzyladenine (BA), Kinetin (Kn), 2-Isopentenyl adenine (2-iP) singly as well as in combination with α-Naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 μM). The highest rate of shoot multiplication (16.0 ± 1.87 for the average shoot number and 5.16 ± 0.38 cm for shoot length) was achieved on MS medium supplemented with 7.5 μM BA and 0.5 μM NAA. The effects of medium type, medium strength, pH and subculture on shoot induction and proliferation were also tested. An average of 21.6±2.87 shoots per explants could be obtained following this protocol. Rooting was achieved on microshoots using half strength MS medium with 2.0 μM Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) after four weeks of culture. The in vitro raised healthy plantlets were successfully established in earthen pots containing garden soil and grown in greenhouse with >80% survival rate.

Keywords

Albizia lebbeck direct organogenesis fabaceae plant regeneration root explants 

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Copyright information

© Northeast Forestry University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shahnaz Perveen
    • 1
  • Ankita Varshney
    • 1
  • Mohammad Anis
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ibrahim M. Aref
    • 2
  1. 1.Plant Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of BotanyAligarh Muslim UniversityAligarhIndia
  2. 2.Department of Plant Production, College of Food & Agricultural SciencesKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia

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