Advertisement

Journal of Forestry Research

, Volume 18, Issue 1, pp 27–30 | Cite as

Comparative analysis of some selected macronutrients of soil in orange orchard and degraded forests in Chittagong Hill Tracts, Bangladesh

  • Mohammad Shaheed Hossain Chowdhury
  • Shampa Biswas
  • Md. Abdul Halim
  • S. M. Sirajul Haque
  • Nur Muhammed
  • Masao Koike
Article

Abstract

Status of organic carbon (C), total nitrogen (N), available potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) in three different depths (0–5 cm, 5–15 cm and 15–30 cm) on two hill slopes of 35% and 55% in orange orchard cultivated by the Mro tribe of Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHTs) were evaluated and compared with those in degraded bush forests, through digging three profiles in each land use. The content of all the five nutrients was found to be higher in the soil of orange orchard than in the soil of forest. But the variation was not consistent for both the slopes. The content varied depth wise also, having the highest value in surface soil in case of both the land uses on both the slopes. A mean available K content was significantly higher in orange orchard than in forest on 55% slope, while it was lower on 35% slope. Surface soil contained the nutrients of K and Ca with the amount of 0.2905-mg·g−1 soil and 3.025-mg·g−1 soil respectively in the orchard, while 0.1934-mg·g−1 soil and 1.6083-mg·g−1 soil were respectively in the forest. Organic carbon and total nitrogen were found more or less similar in surface soil on both the land uses showing a slight difference. Available P was found only in orange orchard, and in forest it was too little in amount to detect by the spectrophotometer. The degraded forests were poor in nutrient content due to high rate of soil erosion, which would be possible to be improved by bringing it under tree cover as proved by the adaptation of orange orchard there.

Keywords

Orange orchard Degraded forests Soil depth Slope Bangladesh 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Chowdhury, M.S.H. and Miah, M.D. 2004. Shifting Cultivation (Jhum) Practice by the Mro tribe in Thanchi Upazilla, Bandarban, Bangladesh. Jahangirnagar University Journal of Science, 27: 187–202.Google Scholar
  2. Denniston, D. 1995. High Priorities: Conserving Mountain Ecosystems and Cultures. World Watch Paper-123. World Watch Institute, Washington D.C., U.S.A. p.80.Google Scholar
  3. Gautam, I.P., Thapa, M.P., Gupta, K.P., et al. 2004. Cultivar Evaluation on Mango in Low Hills of Eastern Nepal. Nepal Net: An Electronic Networking for Sustainable Development in Nepal. National Agricultural Research Center, Nepal.Google Scholar
  4. Hossain, M.K. and Chowdhury, M.A.M. 1984. Studies on the undergrowth of teak (Tectona grandis L.) at Ichamati Forest Beat, Chittagong: A preliminary survey on some soil properties and floristic composition of teak undergrowths. Chittagong University Studies-Part II, 8(1): 79–85.Google Scholar
  5. Hutchinson, R.H.S. 1906. An Account of the Chittagong Hill Tracts. The Bengal Secretariat Book Depot, Writers’ Building, Calcutta, India. p.202.Google Scholar
  6. Jamali, T. 1992. Decomposition of Leaf Litter, Nutrient Release and Soil Nutrient Availability in Four Forest Plantations of Chittagong University Campus, An M. Sc. Thesis, Department of Botany, Chittagong University, Chittagong, Bangladesh. P.150.Google Scholar
  7. Khan, M.S. 1998. Prospects of Ethno-botany and Ethno-botanical Research in Bangladesh. In: R.L. Banik, M.K. Alam, S.J. Pei, A. Rastogi (eds.), Applied Ethno-botany. Bangladesh Forest Research Institute, Chittagong, Bangladesh, Pp 24–27.Google Scholar
  8. Khisa, S.K. 1997. Indigenous Technology/Knowledge of Watershed Management in the Culture of Ethnic Communities of Chittagong Hill Tracts. Paper Presented at the National Workshop on Indigenous Technology/Knowledge in Watershed Management held at Bangladesh Forest Academy, Chittagong from 30th November–3rd December 1997. p.12.Google Scholar
  9. Lewin, T.H. 1869. The Hill Tracts of Chittagong and the Dwellers Therein. Translated by Hirohito Chakma into Bangla. Tribal Cultural Institute, Rangamati, Bangladesh, p106.Google Scholar
  10. Miah, M.D. and Chowdhury, M.S.H. 2004. Traditional forest utilization practice by the Mro Tribe in the Bandarban Region, Bangladesh. Swiss Forestry Journal, 155(3–4): 65–70.Google Scholar
  11. Osman, K.T., Rahaman, M.M., and Sikder, S. 2002. Growth and nutrition of some forest tree species in Bangladesh. Ann. For. Jyoti Publishers and distributors, Dehradun-248006, India, 10(2): 214–227.Google Scholar
  12. Roy, C. 1996. Murung In: P. Bandopadhyay, S. Dutta and K. Sengupta (eds.), Colorful People of Bangladesh. Bangladesh Institute of Theatre and Arts, Mallika-1, Shaheed Mirza Lane, Mehedibagh, Chittagong, Bangladesh, pp 13–18.Google Scholar
  13. SRDI (Soil Resource Development Institute). 2002. Land and Soil Resource Use Directory: Thanchi Upazilla, Bandarban Hill District. Soil Resource Development Institute, Dhaka, Bangladesh. p.150.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Northeast Forestry University and Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohammad Shaheed Hossain Chowdhury
    • 1
  • Shampa Biswas
    • 2
  • Md. Abdul Halim
    • 1
  • S. M. Sirajul Haque
    • 3
  • Nur Muhammed
    • 4
  • Masao Koike
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Forestry, School of Agriculture and Mineral ScienceShahjalal University of Science and TechnologySylhetBangladesh
  2. 2.Department of Mountain ForestryUniversity of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences-BOKUViennaAustria
  3. 3.Institute of Forestry and Environmental SciencesChittagong UniversityChittagongBangladesh
  4. 4.Forest Policy Laboratory, Department of Forest Science, Faculty of AgricultureShinshu UniversityNagano-KenJapan

Personalised recommendations