DIY Genetic Tests: A Product of Fact or Fallacy?

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Notes

  1. 1.

    SNPs are single base pair changes within a DNA sequence.

  2. 2.

    Also known as “genes of interest.”

  3. 3.

    A phenotype refers to the expression of a characteristic, such as hair colour.

  4. 4.

    Receptor: a membrane protein which accepts a molecule to initiate a response.

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Correspondence to Olga C. Pandos.

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Pandos, O.C. DIY Genetic Tests: A Product of Fact or Fallacy?. Bioethical Inquiry 17, 319–324 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11673-020-09995-6

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Keywords

  • Direct-to-consumer
  • Genetic testing
  • DIY genetic test kits
  • DIY genetic tests