Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 433–436 | Cite as

Proposed Theory for the Hydrogen Embrittlement Resistance of Martensitic Precipitation Age-Hardening Stainless Steels such as Custom 455

Technical Article---Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

Over the years, the author has had experience on various programs and vehicle platforms in which martensitic precipitation age-hardening, corrosion-resistant stainless steels such as Custom 455 have demonstrated hydrogen embrittlement resistance. Custom 455 is a double vacuum-melted, martensitic precipitation age-hardening stainless steel, which is reported to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. This paper proposes a plausible rationale for the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement of this type of stainless steel.

Keywords

Hydrogen embrittlement Precipitation-hardening stainless steel Failure mechanism Martensitic 

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Copyright information

© ASM International 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ExponentIrvineUSA

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