Advertisement

Journal of Failure Analysis and Prevention

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 227–232 | Cite as

Pipeline Failure Results from Lightning Strike: Act of Mother Nature?

  • G. T. Quickel
  • J. A. Beavers
Case History---Peer-Reviewed

Abstract

There are more than 2.5 million miles of oil and gas pipelines in the United States. Approximately 900 failures occurred on hazardous liquid pipelines from 2002 to 2003, and 9% of these failures were attributed to damages due to natural force, which included lightning strikes, among other naturally occurring events. This paper provides a case history in which failure analysis was applied to determine the metallurgical cause of a failure involving a polyethylene-coated hydrocarbon pipeline that leaked as a result of a lightning strike.

Keywords

Pipeline Lightning Failure Polyethylene Coating 

References

  1. 1.
    Rosenfeld, M.J.: A simple procedure for synthesizing Charpy impact energy transition curves from limited test data. In: International Pipeline Conference ASME, vol. 1, p. 216 (1996)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Peabody, A.W.: Peabody’s Control of Pipeline Corrosion, 2nd edn., pp. 252–254. NACE International (2001)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kaiser, B.A.: Lightning protection for pipeline compressor stations and other facilities. Pipeline Gas J. 232(11), 64 (2005)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© ASM International 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.DNV Columbus, Inc.DublinUSA

Personalised recommendations