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The impact of a Fracture Liaison Service after 3 years on secondary fracture prevention and mortality in a Portuguese tertiary center

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Abstract

Summary

Despite the establishment of Fracture Liaison Services (FLS) worldwide, no study has evaluated their impact on the Portuguese population. Our work has shown that the implementation of an FLS is associated with a significant increase in OP treatment and a lower risk of secondary fracture.

Purpose

Fracture Liaison Services (FLS) have been established worldwide, with positive effects on treatment, secondary fracture, mortality, and economic burden. However, no study has evaluated their impact on the Portuguese population. Therefore, we purposed to evaluate the effect of an FLS model in a Portuguese center on osteoporosis (OP) treatment, secondary fracture, and mortality rates, 3 years after a fragility fracture.

Methods

Patients over 50 years old, admitted with a fragility fracture, between January 2017 and December 2020, were included in this retrospective study. Patients evaluated after FLS implementation (2019–2020) were compared with those evaluated before (2017–2018) and followed for 36 months. Predictors of secondary fracture and mortality were assessed using a multivariate Cox regression model, adjusted to potential confounders.

Results

A total of 551 patients were included (346 before and 205 after FLS). The FLS significantly increased the rate of OP treatment, when compared with standard clinical practice (8.1% vs 77.6%). During follow-up, the secondary fracture rate was 14.7% and 7.3%, before and after FLS, respectively. FLS was associated with a lower risk of secondary fracture (HR 0.39, C.I. 0.16–0.92). Although we observed a lower mortality rate (25.1% vs 13.7%), FLS was not a significant predictor of survival.

Conclusion

Implementing the FLS model in a Portuguese center has increased OP treatment and reduced the risk of secondary fracture. We believe that our work supports adopting FLS models in national programs.

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Silva, S.P., Mazeda, C., Vilas-Boas, P. et al. The impact of a Fracture Liaison Service after 3 years on secondary fracture prevention and mortality in a Portuguese tertiary center. Arch Osteoporos 19, 4 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11657-023-01363-2

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