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From Molecular Pathology of COVID 19 to Nigella Sativum as a Treatment Option: Scientific Based Evidence of Its Myth or Reality

Abstract

COVID-19 virus is a causative agent of viral pandemic in human beings which specifically targets respiratory system of humans and causes viral pneumonia. This unusual viral pneumonia is rapidly spreading to all parts of the world, currently affecting about 105 million people with 2.3 million deaths. Current review described history, genomic characteristics, replication, and pathogenesis of COVID-19 with special emphasis on Nigella sativum (N. sativum) as a treatment option. N. sativum seeds are historically and religiously used over the centuries, both for prevention and treatment of different diseases. This review summarizes the potential role of N. sativum seeds against COVID-19 infection at levels of in silico, cell lines and animal models.

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Contributions

Atif M and Imran M designed the study, the first half portion of the manuscript related to COVID-19 was wrote by Naz F and supervised by Atif M. The second half portion of the manuscript related to black seeds was wrote by Akhtar J and supervised by Imran M (from University of Health Science). Saleem S helped in designing the figures. Akram J provided suggestions for the design of review. Imran M and Ullah MI revised the manuscript and replied the revisions of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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Correspondence to Muhammad Imran.

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No competing financial interests exist.

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Atif, M., Naz, F., Akhtar, J. et al. From Molecular Pathology of COVID 19 to Nigella Sativum as a Treatment Option: Scientific Based Evidence of Its Myth or Reality. Chin. J. Integr. Med. 28, 88–95 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11655-021-3311-z

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Keywords

  • coronavirus
  • nCoV-19
  • COVID-19
  • Nigella sativum
  • review