A piecewise switched linear approach for traffic flow modeling

Abstract

Traffic modeling is a key step in several intelligent transportation systems (ITS) applications. This paper regards the traffic modeling through the enhancement of the cell transmission model. It considers the traffic flow as a hybrid dynamic system and proposes a piecewise switched linear traffic model. The latter allows an accurate modeling of the traffic flow in a given section by considering its geometry. On the other hand, the piecewise switched linear traffic model handles more than one congestion wave and has the advantage to be modular. The measurements at upstream and downstream boundaries are also used in this model in order to decouple the traffic flow dynamics of successive road portions. Finally, real magnetic sensor data, provided by the performance measurement system on a portion of the Californian SR60-E highway are used to validate the proposed model.

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Correspondence to Abdelhafid Zeroual.

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Recommended by Associate Editor Jyh-Horng Chou

Abdelhafid Zeroual received the M. Sc. degree in industrial computing from the University of Larbi Ben M’Hidi-Oum El Bouaghi, Algeria in 2011. He is a Ph.D. degree candidate in automatic control, industrial computing and signal processing at University 08 May 1945 of Guelma, Algeria.

His research interests include traffic modeling and control, hybrid systems, estimation and hybrid observers.

Nadhir Messai received the M. Sc. and the Ph. D. degrees from the University of Technology of Belfort-Montbliard, France in 2000 and 2003, respectively, all in automatic control. In 2004, he joined the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne, France, where he is currently an associate professor.

His research interests include fault detection and isolation (FDI), hybrid systems, structural analysis and traffic control.

Sihem Kechida received the Ph.D. degree in industrial automation from Electronic Department, Badji Mokhtar University of Annaba, Algeria in 2007. She is currently senior lecturer with the Faculty of Sciences and Technology at University 08 May 1945 of Guelma, Algeria, where she is team research leader of “Diagnosis and Dependability of industrial systems”. She is an editor in chief of the first scientific journal ”JEST” (Journal of Engineering and Science Technology) published in Guelma in 2011. She served as a reviewer for many international conferences as well as member of the assessment commission of international cooperation projects.

Her research interests include fault detection and isolation (FDI) of hybrid dynamical systems (HDS) and transportation systems.

Fatiha Hamdi received M. Sc. degree in industrial control from Colonel Elhadj Lakhdar University of Batna, Algeria in 2002, and the Ph.D. degree in industrial control from Colonel Elhadj Lakhdar University of Batna, Algeria in 2010. She is currently an associate professor at Batna 2 University, Algeria.

Her research interests include traffic control, hybrid systems, estimation and hybrid observers.

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Zeroual, A., Messai, N., Kechida, S. et al. A piecewise switched linear approach for traffic flow modeling. Int. J. Autom. Comput. 14, 729–741 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11633-017-1060-4

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Keywords

  • Switched systems
  • modeling
  • macroscopic
  • traffic flow
  • data calibration