Journal of Mountain Science

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 806–810 | Cite as

The Alpine Seed Conservation and Research Network - a new initiative to conserve valuable plant species in the European Alps

  • Jonas V. Müller
  • Christian Berg
  • Jacqueline Détraz-Méroz
  • Brigitta Erschbamer
  • Noémie Fort
  • Catherine Lambelet-Haueter
  • Vera Margreiter
  • Florian Mombrial
  • Andrea Mondoni
  • Konrad Pagitz
  • Francesco Porro
  • Graziano Rossi
  • Patrick Schwager
  • Elinor Breman
Short Communication
  • 85 Downloads

Abstract

Safeguarding plants as seeds in ex situ collections is a cost effective element in an integrated plant conservation approach. The European Alps are a regional centre of plant diversity. Six institutions have established a regional network covering the European Alps which will conserve at least 500 priority plant species and which will improve the conservation status of plant species in grassland communities in the subalpine, alpine and nival altitudinal belts. Targeted research will expand the knowledge of the ecology of target species. Public engagement activities will raise the awareness for the importance of specific conservation actions in the European Alps.

Keywords

Alpine Seed banks Ex situ conservation Plants Europe Natural grasslands Endemic species 

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Copyright information

© Science Press, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonas V. Müller
    • 1
  • Christian Berg
    • 2
  • Jacqueline Détraz-Méroz
    • 3
  • Brigitta Erschbamer
    • 4
  • Noémie Fort
    • 5
  • Catherine Lambelet-Haueter
    • 3
  • Vera Margreiter
    • 4
  • Florian Mombrial
    • 3
  • Andrea Mondoni
    • 6
  • Konrad Pagitz
    • 4
  • Francesco Porro
    • 6
  • Graziano Rossi
    • 6
  • Patrick Schwager
    • 2
  • Elinor Breman
    • 1
  1. 1.Millennium Seed Bank, Conservation ScienceRoyal Botanic Gardens Kew, Wakehurst Place, ArdinglyWest SussexUK
  2. 2.Karl-Franzens-Universität GrazBotanischer GartenGrazAustria
  3. 3.Conservatoire et Jardin Botaniques de la Ville de GenèveChambésy (GE)Switzerland
  4. 4.Institute of BotanyUniversity of InnsbruckInnsbruckAustria
  5. 5.Conservatoire botanique national alpinDomaine de CharanceGapFrance
  6. 6.Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra e dell’AmbienteUniversità degli studi di PaviaPaviaItaly

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