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Journal of Mountain Science

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 330–341 | Cite as

Engineering geological classification of the structural planes for hydroelectric projects in Emeishan Basalts

  • Shu-qin Sun
  • Run-qiu HuangEmail author
  • Xiang-jun Pei
  • Song-jiang Zhao
Article

Abstract

The scale and characteristics of rock mass are important indexes of the rock mass structural plane classification. This paper firstly analyzes the spatial distribution characteristics, the structural plane types (original structural plane, tectonic structural plane and hypergenic structural plane) and the associated features of the Emeishan basalts and then studies the classification schemes of the built hydropower structure planes of different rock areas (the east district, the central district and the west district) in the Emeishan basalt distribution area, Southwest China. Based on the analysis and comparison of the scale and the engineering geological characteristics of the typical structure planes in the basalt hydroelectric Stations, the types o f structural planes are used in the first order classification. The secondary order classification is made by considering the impact factors of rock mass quality, e.g., the state of the structural planes, infilling, joint opening, extending length, the grade of weathering and strength. The engineering geological classification for Emeishan basalt is proposed. Because there are no evidences of a large structure presenting in study area, the first-order (I) controlling structural planes do not appear in the classification, there only appear II, III, IV and V grade structural planes influencing the rock-mass quality. According to the different rock-block types in bedding fault zone, the second-grade (II) structural planes consisted of bedding fault zone is further classified into II1, II2 and II3. The third-grade (III) structural planes constructed by intraformational faulted zones are not subdivided. According to the different characteristics of intrusion, alteration and weathering unloading structural planes, the IV grade structure plane is divided into IV1, IV2 and IV3. According to the development characteristics of joints and fractures, the V grade structure plane is divided into fracture V1 and columnar joint V2. In all, the structural planes are classified into four groups with nine subsets. The research proposes the engineering geological classification of the structural plane for the hydropower project in the Emishan basalts, and the result of the study has a potential application in similar regions.

Keywords

Emeishan basalt Hydroelectric project Structural plane Bedding fault zone Engineering geological classification 

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Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Science Press, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shu-qin Sun
    • 1
  • Run-qiu Huang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Xiang-jun Pei
    • 1
  • Song-jiang Zhao
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Geohazard Prevention and Geoenvironment ProtectionChengdu University of TechnologyChengduChina

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