Journal of Mountain Science

, Volume 9, Issue 5, pp 613–627 | Cite as

Local variability in temperature, humidity and radiation in the BaekduDaegan Mountain protected area of Korea

  • Heemun Chae
  • Hyunju Lee
  • Sangsin Lee
  • Yukyong Cheong
  • Gijeung Um
  • Bryan Mark
  • Nathan Patrick
Article

Abstract

A novel embedded sensor network records changes in key climatic-environmental variables over a range of altitude in the BaekduDaegan Mountain (BDM) of Gangwon Province in Korea, a protected mountain region with unique biodiversity undergoing climate change research. The investigated area is subdivided into three horizontal north-south study areas. Three variables, temperature (T, °C), relative humidity (RH, %), and light intensity (LI, lumens m−2, or lux, lx), have been continuously measured at hourly intervals from June, 2010 to September, 2011 using HOBO H8 devices at 10 fixed study sites. These hourly observations are aggregated to monthly, seasonal and annual mean values, and results are summarized to inaugurate a long-term climate change investigation. A region wide T difference in accordance with altitude, or lapse rate, over the interval is calculated as 0.4°C 100 m−1. T lapse rates change seasonally, with winter lapse rates being greater than those of summer. RH is elevated in summer compared to other seasons. LI within forestland is lower during summer and higher during other seasons. The obtained results could closely relate to the vegetation type and structure and the terrain state since data loggers were located in forestland.

Keywords

Embedded sensors Temperature lapse rates Relative humidity Light intensity Forest Climate change BaekduDaegan Mountain 

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Copyright information

© Science Press, Institute of Mountain Hazards and Environment, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heemun Chae
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hyunju Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sangsin Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yukyong Cheong
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gijeung Um
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bryan Mark
    • 3
    • 2
  • Nathan Patrick
    • 3
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Forest Environment Protection, College of Forest and Environmental ScienceKangwon National UniversityChuncheon city, GangwonDoRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Division of ResearchClimate Change Research Institute of KoreaGangwon DoRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Geography and Byrd Polar Research CenterOhio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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