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Effects of customer personal characteristics on the satisfaction-loyalty link: a multi-method approach

Abstract

This study aims to examine the moderating effects of customer personal characteristics on the satisfaction-loyalty link in order to overcome potential response bias and common-method variance in the link by using both real-life purchasing behavior data and survey in a cross-method and panel data. Two separate data collection procedures dealt with survey and customer relationship management (CRM) data. A total of 391 members of restaurant loyalty program participated in the survey. Also, additional data were gathered on restaurant CRM. Data were analyzed using SEM and multi-group analysis. This study confirmed the nonlinear relationship between customer satisfaction and brand loyalty due to the significant moderating effects of customers’ personal characteristics on subsequent stages of the link.

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Acknowledgments

This research is supported by Sejong Universities’ research fund.

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Correspondence to JungKun Park.

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Lee, A., Back, KJ. & Park, J. Effects of customer personal characteristics on the satisfaction-loyalty link: a multi-method approach. Serv Bus 11, 279–297 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11628-016-0308-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11628-016-0308-3

Keywords

  • Attitudinal brand loyalty
  • Satisfaction loyalty link
  • Multi-method approach
  • Customer relationship data