Politische Vierteljahresschrift

, Volume 47, Issue 1, pp 89–101

Der demokratische Musterbürger als Normalfall? Kognitionspsychologische Einblicke in die black box politischer Meinungsbildung

  • Harald Schoen
Literaturbericht

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Literatur

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© VS Verlag 2006

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  • Harald Schoen

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