Positive Psychologie: Eine allgemeine Einführung und Zusammenfassung der Forschung

Positive Psychology: A general introduction and summary of research

Zusammenfassung

Die Positive Psychologie beschäftigt sich mit den Aspekten des Lebens, die es aus psychologischer Sicht lebenswert machen. Dieser Beitrag liefert einen Überblick über die Geschichte und Professionalisierung der Positiven Psychologie sowie eine Zusammenfassung ausgewählter zentraler Konzepte und Theorien. Ein Schwerpunkt nimmt dabei die Beschreibung von Charakterstärken als positive Persönlichkeitseigenschaften und dazugehörige Forschungsbefunde ein, da stärkenbasierte Ansätze vielfältig Anwendung im Coaching- und Beratungskontext finden. Der Grund hierfür liegt in der Vielzahl von Studien, die die vorteilhafte Rolle von Charakterstärken und deren Anwendung im beruflichen Kontext unterstreichen.

Abstract

Positive Psychology is the scientific, psychological study of what makes life worth living. This paper provides an overview about the history and professionalization of positive psychology as well as a summary of selected concepts and theories. Special emphasis will be given to the description of character strengths as positive traits and related research, because strengths-based approaches are applied in many ways within the context of coaching and counseling. This might be, because of the variety of studies highlighting the beneficial role of character strengths and their application in the working context.

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Correspondence to Dr. Claudia Harzer.

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Harzer, C. Positive Psychologie: Eine allgemeine Einführung und Zusammenfassung der Forschung. Organisationsberat Superv Coach 24, 253–267 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11613-017-0509-1

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Schlüsselwörter

  • Positive Psychologie
  • Einführung
  • Charakterstärken

Keywords

  • Positive psychology
  • Introduction
  • Character strengths