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Table 2 New York State Primary Care Physician Respondent Perceptions of Reproductive Health Services, 2017

From: New York State Primary Care Physician Practices and Perspectives on Offering Reproductive Health Services

Variable Total
(N = 443)
n (%)
Family medicine
(n = 216)
n (%)
Internal medicine
(n = 183)
n (%)
Other
(n = 25)
n (%)
Perceived benefits (mean, (SD))*,† 8.4 (4.3, range 0–14) 9.8 (3.8, range 0–14) 6.7 (4.3, range 0–13) 9.5 (3.6, range 0–13)
Perceived benefits of providing reproductive health services†,‡
  Increases access to reproductive health services 353 (82) 192 (89) 134 (74) 22 (92)
  Patient convenience 352 (82) 188 (87) 137 (75) 21 (88)
  Continuity of care 317 (73) 186 (86) 107 (59) 19 (79)
  Avoids missed opportunity for contraception 308 (71) 172 (80) 112 (62) 19 (79)
  Increases contraceptive use 291 (67) 169 (78) 100 (55) 18 (75)
  Normalizes sexual and reproductive health 284 (66) 165 (76) 96 (53) 19 (79)
  Patient preference 262 (61) 156 (72) 85 (47) 16 (67)
  Improves preconception health 259 (60) 160 (74) 75 (41) 21 (88)
  Ensures appropriate counseling when prescribing medications contraindicated for pregnancy 258 (60) 156 (72) 83 (46) 17 (71)
  Holistic approach to health 257 (60) 149 (69) 89 (49) 14 (58)
  Management of chronic conditions for women who become pregnant 237 (55) 140 (65) 74 (41) 18 (75)
  All information in electronic health record 226 (52) 137 (63) 73 (40) 13 (54)
  Increases folic acid use 205 (48) 132 (61) 59 (32) 12 (50)
  None 8 (2) 0 (0) 6 (3) 0 (0)
Perceived disadvantages/barriers (mean, (SD))*,† 1.5 (1.5, range 0–9) 1.1 (1.3, range 0–8) 2.0 (1.5, range 0–6) 1.8 (1.8, range 0–7)
Perceived disadvantages/barriers to providing reproductive health services†,‡
  Not well trained 218 (51) 81 (38) 120 (66) 13 (54)
  Additional time (detracts from other primary care services) 138 (32) 47 (22) 78 (43) 9 (38)
  Unclear reimbursement/billing 98 (23) 45 (21) 46 (25) 5 (21)
  May not be patient preference 69 (16) 21 (10) 40 (22) 6 (25)
  Discomfort with reproductive health discussions 37 (9) 12 (6) 20 (11) 4 (17)
  Not within the primary care scope of practice 32 (7) 1 (1) 28 (15) 2 (8)
  Reduces support for stand-alone reproductive health clinics 20 (5) 6 (3) 11 (6) 2 (8)
  Stigma 18 (4) 8 (4) 7 (4) 2 (8)
  Detracts from patient-centered care 6 (1) 1 (1) 4 (2) 0 (0)
  None 154 (36) 98 (45) 43 (24) 8 (33)
Most important reproductive health service to add‡,§
  Contraceptive counseling 120 (29) 43 (21) 71 (40) 5 (20)
  Cervical cancer screening 119 (29) 43 (21) 69 (39) 6 (24)
  HIV/STI testing and counseling 113 (27) 34 (16) 72 (41) 6 (24)
  Transgender services 79 (19) 47 (22) 28 (16) 3 (12)
  All services already provided 78 (19) 57 (27) 14 (8) 7 (28)
  Sexual dysfunction counseling 76 (18) 28 (13) 41 (23) 6 (24)
  Routine pregnancy intentions screening 72 (17) 26 (12) 44 (25) 2 (8)
  Preconception care and counseling 67 (16) 27 (13) 38 (21) 2 (8)
  Prenatal care 50 (12) 23 (11) 23 (13) 3 (12)
  Infertility evaluation 39 (9) 20 (10) 15 (8) 4 (16)
  Postpartum care 32 (8) 15 (7) 14 (8) 2 (8)
  Induced abortion 27 (7) 17 (8) 6 (3) 4 (16)
  Spontaneous abortion management 26 (6) 20 (10) 5 (3) 1 (4)
  None 57 (14) 32 (15) 18 (10) 5 (20)
  1. *p < 0.0001
  2. n = 11 missing
  3. ‡Percentages sum to greater than 100 as respondents were able to choose more than 1 response
  4. §n = 27 missing