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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 6, pp 789–791 | Cite as

Association between Job Factors, Burnout, and Preference for a New Job: a Nationally Representative Physician Survey

  • Michael T. Huber
  • Sandra A. Ham
  • Muneeba Qayyum
  • Lana Akkari
  • Tokunboh Olaosebikan
  • Joseph Abraham
  • John D. Yoon
Concise Research Reports

INTRODUCTION

Physician turnover contributes to decreased physician productivity, decreased quality of patient care, and increased costs to healthcare systems.15 We used an experimental vignette to test associations between physician demographics, salary, and working with exemplary colleagues on the likelihood of preferring a new job among burned out and non-burned out physicians in various specialties.

METHODS

A nationally representative sample of 2000 US physicians in various specialties were surveyed in 2011. We experimentally manipulated the effect of characteristics of a hypothetical new job on physicians’ willingness to change jobs from their current job to a new job: “Imagine a physician job that is similar to the position you currently have, except that in the new job you would: 1) spend ten {fewer or more} hours each week caring for patients, 2) care for patients who are, on average, {healthier or less healthy} than your current patients, and 3) earn 20% {more or less} in...

KEY WORDS

Salary Colleagues Burnout Job preference Job satisfaction 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We would like to thank Farr Curlin, MD for his mentorship and support of this project.

Source of funding

Michael Huber was supported in part by a grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (T32 HS000078). This study was supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation (Grant ID#13534) and by a pilot grant from the Bucksbaum Institute for Clinical Excellence at the University of Chicago.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael T. Huber
    • 1
  • Sandra A. Ham
    • 2
  • Muneeba Qayyum
    • 3
  • Lana Akkari
    • 3
  • Tokunboh Olaosebikan
    • 3
  • Joseph Abraham
    • 3
  • John D. Yoon
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Medicine University of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Center for Health and the Social SciencesUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineMercy Hospital and Medical CenterChicagoUSA

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