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Pitfalls with Smartphones in Medicine

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Acknowledgements

This article was supported by the Canada Research Chair in Medical Decision Science. The funding agency had no role in the design, analysis, or decision to publish the findings. We thank Irfan Dhalla, John Staples, and Christopher Yarnell for helpful comments on specific points.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they do not have any conflicts of interest.

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Correspondence to Donald A. Redelmeier MD, MSc.

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Redelmeier, D.A., Detsky, A.S. Pitfalls with Smartphones in Medicine. J GEN INTERN MED 28, 1260–1263 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-013-2467-4

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KEY WORDS

  • information exchange
  • smartphones
  • healthcare communication
  • medical decision-making
  • mobile technology
  • clinical efficiency