Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 148–153 | Cite as

Patient Expectations as Predictors of Outcome In Patients with Acute Low Back Pain

  • Samuel S. Myers
  • Russell S. Phillips
  • Roger B. Davis
  • Daniel C. Cherkin
  • Anna Legedza
  • Ted J. Kaptchuk
  • Andrea Hrbek
  • Julie E. Buring
  • Diana Post
  • Maureen T. Connelly
  • David M. Eisenberg
Original Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Few studies have evaluated the association between patient expectations for recovery and clinical outcomes, and no study has evaluated whether asking patients to choose their therapy modifies such an association.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the association between patients’ expectations and functional recovery in patients with acute low back pain (LBP), and to determine whether that association is affected by giving patients choice of therapy.

DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS

A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing usual care alone to usual care plus choice of chiropractic, acupuncture, or massage in 444 adults with acute LBP, lasting less than 21 days.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS

Primary outcome was functional disability (Roland score) at 5 and 12 weeks. Patients’ general expectations for improvement were associated with improvement in functional status (β = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.56, 1.36). A 1-point increase in general expectations was associated with a 0.96-point improvement in Roland score. The association of expectation with outcome was 2–3 times greater in the usual care group than the choice group. However, these differences did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS

In patients with acute LBP, higher expectations for recovery are associated with greater functional improvement. Eliciting patient expectations for improvement may be a simple way to identify patients with the highest (or lowest) likelihood of experiencing functional improvement. Incorporating questions about patient expectations in future trials may clarify the role of this important correlate of clinical outcomes.

KEY WORDS

expectations preference choice low back pain randomized controlled trial 

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel S. Myers
    • 1
  • Russell S. Phillips
    • 2
    • 3
  • Roger B. Davis
    • 2
    • 3
  • Daniel C. Cherkin
    • 4
  • Anna Legedza
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ted J. Kaptchuk
    • 2
  • Andrea Hrbek
    • 2
  • Julie E. Buring
    • 2
  • Diana Post
    • 2
  • Maureen T. Connelly
    • 5
  • David M. Eisenberg
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical SchoolMount Auburn HospitalCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.Division for Research and Education in Complementary and Integrative Medical Therapies, Osher InstituteHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  3. 3.Division of General Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical SchoolBeth Israel Deaconess Medical CenterBostonUSA
  4. 4.Group Health Center for Health StudiesSeattleUSA
  5. 5.Department of Ambulatory Care and PreventionHarvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health CareBostonUSA

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