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Investigation of acoustic signals correlated with the flow of muons of cosmic rays, in connection with seismic activity of the north Tien Shan

  • K. M. MukashevEmail author
  • T. Kh. Sadykov
  • V. A. Ryabov
  • A. L. Shepetov
  • G. Ya. Khachikyan
  • N. M. Salikhov
  • A. D. Muradov
  • O. A. Novolodskaya
  • V. V. Zhukov
  • A. Kh. Argynova
Research Article - Atmospheric & Space Sciences
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Abstract

The work is aimed at revealing a possible connection between seismic activity and cosmic-ray muon fluxes capable of penetrating into the Earth’s crust and generating a nuclear electromagnetic cascade in a tense seismically active medium, leading to the formation of microcracks, the opening of which is accompanied by the generation of acoustic and, under certain conditions, seismic energy as predicted by Tsarev and Chechin (Atmospheric muons and high-frequency seismic noise. In: Preprint of the FIAN, vol 179, 1988). The data of the underground installation (in a well at a depth of 52 m) for monitoring geoacoustic signals correlated in time with the flow of high-energy cosmic-ray muons generated in extensive atmospheric showers implemented on the basis of the experimental complex “ATHLET” in the Tien Shan High-Altitude Scientific Station of the Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences were used. It is found that the daily number of acoustic pulses increases significantly before and during appreciable regional earthquakes. The most pronounced pulsed emissions of acoustic energy, correlated in time with the flow of high-energy cosmic-ray muons generated in extensive atmospheric showers, are followed by an increasing seismic activity in the region, that support idea that penetrating into Earth’s crust the flux of cosmic-ray muons may become a “trigger” of earthquake.

Keywords

Extensive atmospheric showers Penetrating muons Geoacoustic emission Earthquakes at northern Tien Shan 

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Copyright information

© Institute of Geophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences & Polish Academy of Sciences 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. M. Mukashev
    • 1
    Email author
  • T. Kh. Sadykov
    • 2
  • V. A. Ryabov
    • 3
  • A. L. Shepetov
    • 3
  • G. Ya. Khachikyan
    • 4
  • N. M. Salikhov
    • 4
  • A. D. Muradov
    • 1
  • O. A. Novolodskaya
    • 2
  • V. V. Zhukov
    • 3
  • A. Kh. Argynova
    • 2
  1. 1.Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, AlmatyAlmatyKazakhstan
  2. 2.Satbayev University, Institute of Physics and TechnologyAlmatyKazakhstan
  3. 3.P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (LPI)MoscowRussia
  4. 4.Institute of Ionosphere, NCSRTAlmatyKazakhstan

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