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Clinical significance of hTERC gene amplification detection by FISH in the screening of cervical lesions

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Summary

This study evaluated the clinical significance of hTERC gene amplification detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the screening of cervical lesions. Cervical specimens of 50 high risk patients were detected by thin liquid-based cytology. The patients whose cytological results were classified as ASCUS or above were subjected to the subsequent colposcopic biopsies. Slides prepared from these 50 cervical specimens were analyzed for hTERC gene amplification using interphase FISH with the two-color hTERC probe. The results of the cytological analysis and those of subsequent biopsies, when available, were compared with the FISH-detected hTERC abnormalities. It was found that the positive rates of hTERC gene amplification in NILM, ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL, and SCC groups were 0.00, 28.57%, 57.14%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. The positive rates of hTERC gene amplification in HSIL and SCC groups were significantly higher than those in NILM, ASCUS and LSIL groups (all P<0.05). The mean percentages of cells with hTERC gene amplification in NILM, ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL, and SCC groups were 0.00, 10.50%, 36.00%, 79.00%, and 96.50%, respectively. Patients with HSIL or SCC cytological diagnoses had significantly higher mean percentages of cells with hTERC gene amplification than did patients with NILM, ASCUS or LSIL cytological diagnoses (all P<0.05). It was concluded that two-color interphase FISH could detect hTERC gene amplification to accurately distinguish HSIL and ISIL of cervical cells. It may be an adjunct to cytology screening, especially high-risk patients.

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Yuan Zhang and Xiaobei Wang contributed equally to this work.

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Zhang, Y., Wang, X., Ma, L. et al. Clinical significance of hTERC gene amplification detection by FISH in the screening of cervical lesions. J. Huazhong Univ. Sci. Technol. [Med. Sci.] 29, 368–371 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11596-009-0321-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11596-009-0321-z

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