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Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles mediated gene therapy for breast cancer — An In Vitro study

Summary

The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of using TRAIL gene to treat breast cancer mediated with a novel carrier — magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (polyMAG-1000) coated with PEI. The magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were used as gene carrier to transfect TRAIL gene into MCF-7 cells. The polyMAG-1000 without TRAIL gene was transfected into the tumor cells as negative control. TRAIL gene transfection with liposome as carrier served as positive control. The apoptosis of cells was detected with TUNEL method. The apoptosis ratio of tumor cells was measured with flow cytometry (FCM). It was found that the apoptosis occurred in the tumor cells after transfection of TRAIL gene mediated by both polyMAG-1000 and liposome. The apoptosis ratio in the group with polyMAG-1000 as gene carrier was (25.11 ± 2.85) %, whereas it was (5.06 ± 1.05) % in the control group with polyMAG-1000 (P<0.01). The apoptosis ratio was as low as (18.31 ± 2.44) % in the group with liposome as gene carrier (P<0.05, as compared with the group with polyMAG-1000 as gene carrier). It is suggested that TRAIL gene may induce apoptosis in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with PEI may be a potential gene carrier with high transfection efficacy for cancer gene therapy.

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Correspondence to Wu Hua.

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This project was supported by a grant from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 30171062).

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Wei, W., Xu, C. & Wu, H. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles mediated gene therapy for breast cancer — An In Vitro study. J. Huazhong Univ. Sc. Technol. 26, 728–730 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11596-006-0628-y

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11596-006-0628-y

Key words

  • Nanoparticles
  • TRAIL
  • gene therapy
  • breast cancer