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Transnational Islamic education in Indonesia: an ideological perspective

Abstract

This article analyzes how the emergence of transnational Islam with its global network has changed the face of Indonesian Islam. As part of transnational Islam, the Salafi movement has embellished its ideology through the educational sphere, so it is called transnational Islamic education. The Integrated Islamic School and the Institute of Islamic and Arabic Sciences show the ideological nuances in the education process of these two educational institutions. In this context, there is an ideological struggle between both the Egyptian and the Saudian model of Salafi education with the national education based on Pancasila. With the main agenda of the establishment of an Islamic state and putting the Shariah into practice, the Salafi education can pose a threat to global democratic order. Many cases indicate that perpetrators of global radicalism and terrorism are graduates of Salafi model schools. This proves that global democracy is currently in an ideological struggle with transnational Islamic education.

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Acknowledgements

The writer wishes to thank Prof. M. Hilmy of UIN Sunan Ampel Surabaya who helped proofread and give his critical comments on the draft of this article.

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Correspondence to Toto Suharto.

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Suharto, T. Transnational Islamic education in Indonesia: an ideological perspective. Cont Islam 12, 101–122 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11562-017-0409-3

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Keywords

  • Ideology of education
  • National education
  • Transnational Islamic education
  • Integrated Islamic school
  • Institution of Islamic and Arabic sciences