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Julia C. Morse. 2022. The Bankers’ Blacklist: Unofficial Market Enforcement and the Global Fight Against Illicit Financing. (Ithaca: Cornell University Press). Michele Riccardi. 2022. Money Laundering Blacklists. (New York: Routledge). Nkechikwu Valerie Azinge-Egbiri. 2021. Regulating and Combating Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing: The Law in Emerging Economies. (New York: Routledge)

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Notes

  1. The Journal of Money Laundering Control and the Journal of Financial Crime are officially affiliated with the Cambridge Symposium on Economic Crime.

  2. The Association of Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialists oversees the ACAMS certification. The Association of Certified Financial Crime Specialists is a newer, competing association.

  3. These indicators were developed by colleagues at Transcrime. They are interesting measures that deserve much greater discussion than this review allows. See Jofre et al., 2021.

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Nance, M. Julia C. Morse. 2022. The Bankers’ Blacklist: Unofficial Market Enforcement and the Global Fight Against Illicit Financing. (Ithaca: Cornell University Press). Michele Riccardi. 2022. Money Laundering Blacklists. (New York: Routledge). Nkechikwu Valerie Azinge-Egbiri. 2021. Regulating and Combating Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing: The Law in Emerging Economies. (New York: Routledge). Rev Int Organ (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11558-022-09466-0

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