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Mycological Progress

, 15:15 | Cite as

An initial assessment of genetic diversity for Phytophthora capsici in northern and central Mexico

  • Arturo Castro-Rocha
  • Sandesh Shrestha
  • Becky Lyon
  • Graciela Lizette Grimaldo-Pantoja
  • Juan Pedro Flores-Marges
  • José Valero-Galván
  • Marisela Aguirre-Ramírez
  • Pedro Osuna-Ávila
  • Nuria Gómez-Dorantes
  • Graciela Ávila-Quezada
  • José de Jesús Luna-Ruíz
  • Gerardo Rodríguez-Alvarado
  • Sylvia Patricia Fernández-PavíaEmail author
  • Kurt Lamour
Original Article

Abstract

Phytophthora capsici causes significant damage to vegetable production in Mexico, but very little is known about the population structure or how populations survive and spread. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of P. capsici isolates recovered from 1998–2014 in central and northern Mexico. Isolates (n = 81) were genotyped for 33 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) loci using a targeted sequencing approach. There were a total of 72 unique genotypes and both the A1 and A2 mating types were common in both regions. Genetic analyses suggest clonal reproduction may play a more prominent role in the north, but the large proportion of unique genotypes and the finding of both mating types throughout both regions suggests outcrossing and sexual recombination likely play an important role in the overall epidemiology. Further studies with finer scale sampling at single locations over multiple years will be valuable.

Keywords

Oomycetes SNP Bayesian clustering Outcrossing rate 

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Copyright information

© German Mycological Society and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arturo Castro-Rocha
    • 1
  • Sandesh Shrestha
    • 2
  • Becky Lyon
    • 2
  • Graciela Lizette Grimaldo-Pantoja
    • 1
  • Juan Pedro Flores-Marges
    • 1
  • José Valero-Galván
    • 1
  • Marisela Aguirre-Ramírez
    • 1
  • Pedro Osuna-Ávila
    • 1
  • Nuria Gómez-Dorantes
    • 3
  • Graciela Ávila-Quezada
    • 4
  • José de Jesús Luna-Ruíz
    • 5
  • Gerardo Rodríguez-Alvarado
    • 3
  • Sylvia Patricia Fernández-Pavía
    • 3
    Email author
  • Kurt Lamour
    • 2
  1. 1.Departamento de Ciencias Químico-BiológicasUniversidad Autónoma de Cd. Juárez, ChihuahuaChihuahuaMéxico
  2. 2.Department of Entomology and Plant PathologyUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  3. 3.Laboratorio de Patología Vegetal, Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias y ForestalesUniversidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de HidalgoMichoacánMéxico
  4. 4.Facultad de Zootecnia y EcologíaUniversidad Autónoma de ChihuahuaChihuahuaMéxico
  5. 5.Centro de Ciencias AgropecuariasUniversidad Autónoma de AguascalientesAguascalientesMéxico

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