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Developing Faculty to Teach with Technology: Themes from the Literature

Abstract

Technology has changed higher education; yet, many faculty are still hesitant to teach with technology. Faculty development might help change this, but questions remain on the best ways to help faculty teach with technology. Given this problem, we conducted a review of the literature to identify some best practices on how to develop faculty to teach with technology in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to present themes of faculty development research in higher education published from 2013 to 2018 where teaching with technology is a central component of the study. The results suggest that mentorship and faculty-teaching-faculty are effective strategies, that online delivery methods continue to grow, that teaching with technology warrants cross-disciplinary collaboration and that faculty motivations vary across rank and discipline.

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Belt, E., Lowenthal, P. Developing Faculty to Teach with Technology: Themes from the Literature. TechTrends 64, 248–259 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11528-019-00447-6

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Keywords

  • Faculty development
  • Higher education
  • Teaching with technology