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On the acquisition of inflectional morphology: introduction

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Dressler, W.U. On the acquisition of inflectional morphology: introduction. Morphology 22, 1–8 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11525-011-9198-1

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Keywords

  • Language Acquisition
  • Compound Word
  • Child Language
  • Derivational Morphology
  • Noun Plural