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Decreased global field synchronization of multichannel frontal EEG measurements in obsessive-compulsive disorders

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Abstract

Global field synchronization (GFS) quantifies the synchronization level of brain oscillations. The GFS method has been introduced to measure functional synchronization of EEG data in the frequency domain. GFS also detects phase interactions between EEG signals acquired from all of the electrodes. If a considerable amount of local brain neurons has the same phase, these neurons appear to interact with each other. EEG data were received from 17 obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients and 17 healthy controls (HC). OCD effects on local and large-scale brain circuits were studied. Analysis of the GFS results showed significantly decreased values in the delta and full frequency bands. This research suggests that OCD causes synchronization disconnection in both the frontal and large-scale regions. This may be related to motivational, emotional and cognitive dysfunctions.

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Correspondence to Mehmet Akif Özçoban.

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Özçoban, M.A., Tan, O., Aydin, S. et al. Decreased global field synchronization of multichannel frontal EEG measurements in obsessive-compulsive disorders. Med Biol Eng Comput 56, 331–338 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11517-017-1689-8

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