Sensing Happiness in Senseless Information

Abstract

This work develops a theory of happiness from value mechanisms. We assume two opposite states of expectation and information that combine (superpose) to create a mixed state of value. Value’s state probabilistically subsists (by the auto-creative expectational states in uncertainty, i.e., the possibility of many solutions) and collapses into a unique solution (by the auto-destructive informational state, i.e., the disclosure of the solution). Happiness emerges from these collapse moments when expectation reaches its “wanted” novel information as the ultimate reward. Evidence to substantiate this theory comes from value mechanisms in economics, biology, and physics.

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Correspondence to Ünsal Özdilek.

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Özdilek, Ü. Sensing Happiness in Senseless Information. Applied Research Quality Life (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-020-09854-x

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Keywords

  • Happiness
  • Expectation
  • Information
  • Value
  • Use value
  • Exchange value
  • Scarcity
  • Price
  • Cost
  • Income
  • Paradox
  • Mind