Cognitive and Structural Social Capital as Predictors of Quality of Life for Sub-Saharan African Migrants in Germany

Abstract

This paper assesses the structural links between Cognitive Social Capital (CSC), Structural Social Capital (SSC), and Quality of Life (QoL) among Sub-Saharan African (SSA) migrants in Germany. Data from 518 SSA migrants in Germany were analysed. QoL as measured by EUROHIS-QOL 8-item Index, CSC, and SSC were included in a Structural Equation Model performed with Analysis of Moment Structures and Maximum Likelihood as methods of estimation. The overall model fit was evaluated based on the Chi-Square Statistic (χ2), the Comparative Fit Index (CFI), the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) and the Standardised Root Mean Squared Residual (SRMR). The structural model testing the direct effects of CSC and SSC on QoL had a good fit with χ2(47) = 157.60, p < .01, χ2/df = 3.35, CFI = .95; RMSEA = .07 (p = .007; 90% CI = .06/.08); and SRMR = .04 and explained 15% of the variance in QoL. Significant direct effects of CSC and SSC were found on QoL, with β = .27, p < .01 and β = .23, p < .01, respectively. Furthermore, multi-group analyses yielded no significant differences in the structural weights across genders (Δχ2(2) = 5.46, p = .07) or German language skill levels (Δχ2(2) = 2.27, p = .32). SSC and CSC are significant for facilitating quality of life among SSA migrants living in Germany. While these findings support results from previous research, they provide a unique insight into the life of SSA migrants in Germany and provoke more questions concerning the wellbeing of this migrant group.

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Correspondence to Adekunle Adedeji.

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Appendix

Appendix

Table 3 Comparison of AuslaendBevoelkerung 2016 and Social Capital and quality of life survey 2017 by Sex ratio, Average age, and Family status
Table 4 Socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of Sub-Saharan African migrants in Germany

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Adedeji, A., Silva, N. & Bullinger, M. Cognitive and Structural Social Capital as Predictors of Quality of Life for Sub-Saharan African Migrants in Germany. Applied Research Quality Life (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-019-09784-3

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Keywords

  • Cognitive social capital
  • Structural social capital
  • Quality of life
  • Sub-Saharan African migrants
  • Well-being