A Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy on Symptom and Functioning Improvement in Patients with Bipolar Disorders

Abstract

We conducted a meta-analysis by analyzing randomized controlled trials (RCTs), to investigate whether interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) exerts improvement effects on patients with bipolar disorders. We searched for relevant articles in 8 databases, included PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, Embase, PsycArticles, PsycInfo, Cochrane, and CEPS, without limitations on publication year and language. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) used IPSRT as an intervention, and patients with bipolar disorders were included. Two reviewers independently searched, screened the articles, and extracted the data. Treatment effects, heterogeneity, publication bias, and risk of bias were examined. Analyses were performed using the random-effects model. We included and analyzed 5 independent RCTs with 631 patients. IPSRT significantly improved overall functioning (i.e. occupational, social, and impaired functioning; Hedges’s g (g) = −0.344); however, IPSRT did not significantly improve the symptoms. IPSRT had small effects on improving overall functioning in patients with bipolar disorders, which suggested that IPSRT was an adjunctive treatment. This meta-analysis showed that IPRST was effective in improving overall functioning for patients with bipolar disorders.

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Acknowledgments

The authors thank Wallace Academic Editing for editing the paper for English grammar and usage.

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Correspondence to Min-Huey Chung.

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This study was funded by Ministry of Science and Technology in Taiwan (grant number: MOST 103-2314-B-038 -048 -MY3).

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Lam, C., Chung, MH. A Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy on Symptom and Functioning Improvement in Patients with Bipolar Disorders. Applied Research Quality Life (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11482-019-09740-1

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Keywords

  • Bipolar disorders
  • Problem solving therapy
  • Depression
  • Psychotherapy
  • Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy