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Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 1–4 | Cite as

Opendra “Bill” Narayan (1936–2007): A Personal Tribute to a Friend, Teacher, and Colleague

  • Shilpa Buch
  • Barry T. Rouse
  • Howard E. Gendelman
  • M. Christine Zink
  • Janice E. Clements
Guest Commentary

Globally renowned HIV researcher Opendra “Bill” Narayan, of the University of Kansas Medical Center, died unexpectedly at the age of 71. Bill, a veterinarian and virologist, obtained fame over a decade ago after creating a type of HIV that resulted in a disease in monkeys that resembled AIDS in humans. His outstanding accomplishments and contributions in the field were a testimony to the Pioneer Award in neurovirology that he received in 2006. Reflections from his past trainees about his mentoring and teaching skills and their interactions with him are a small tribute to this larger than life legend.

Opendra “Bill” Narayan, an internationally recognized scientist and pioneer in AIDS research, died on December 24, 2007 at the age of 71. For those people in so many fields who knew him, his death has left a large void.

Born in Essequibo, Guyana in November 1936, Bill developed a fascination for natural sciences from an early age, and this attraction led him to pursue a career in science....

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shilpa Buch
    • 1
  • Barry T. Rouse
    • 2
  • Howard E. Gendelman
    • 3
  • M. Christine Zink
    • 4
  • Janice E. Clements
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Molecular and Integrative PhysiologyUniversity of Kansas Medical CenterKansas CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathobiologyUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacology and Experimental NeuroscienceUniversity of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Comparative MedicineJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  5. 5.Department of Molecular and Comparative PathobiologyJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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